Takanoiwa Yoshimori

Takanoiwa Yoshimori
貴ノ岩 義司
Takanoiwa 2014.jpg
Personal information
Born Adiyagiin Baasandorj Адъяагийн Баасандорж
(1990-02-26) 26 February 1990 (age 27)
Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia
Height 1.79 m (5 ft 10 12 in)
Weight 148 kg (326 lb)
Career
Stable Takanohana
Current rank see below
Debut November, 2008
Highest rank Maegashira 2 (Mar 2017)
Championships 1 (Jūryō)
1 (Sandanme)
Special Prizes Fighting spirit (1)
Outstanding Performance (1)
Gold Stars 1 (Hakuho)
* Up to date as of Oct 30, 2017.

Takanoiwa Yoshimori (born 26 February 1990 as Adiyagiin Baasandorj) is a sumo wrestler from Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia. He made his professional debut in November 2008. He has both a sandanme and a jūryō division championship. He reached the jūryō division in July 2012 and the top makuuchi division for the first time in January 2014. He is the first wrestler recruited by former yokozuna Takanohana to reach the elite sekitori ranks. He has been runner-up in one top division tournament and earned two special prizes, one for Fighting Spirit and one for Outstanding Performance. His highest rank is maegashira 2.

Early life and sumo background[]

Baasandorj passed a selective test administered by a Japanese coach from Johoku High School in Shimane Prefecture, who had come to Mongolia looking for sumo prospects. He was then invited to come to Japan as an exchange student on a sumo program at the age of sixteen. Only three months after coming to Japan, his father died of liver disease in Mongolia. He had already lost his mother to heart disease when he was eight years old. Through this adversity, he still managed to excel, and in 2007 made the best four in the individual category at a national junior sumo competition and in 2008 finished second in the middle-weight category at the World Junior Sumo Championships held in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

Career[]

In November 2008 he joined Takanohana stable, run by former yokozuna Takanohana who he had idolized since a young age. The ring name he would choose is purported to have come from a chance meeting with singer and author Akihiro Miwa in Haneda airport, as he was being accompanied by Takanohana from Shimane prefecture to his new stable. Upon meeting him, Miwa described him a "like a rock" (岩 iwa). This left an impression on him and that very evening he consulted with his stablemaster and together they conceived of the ring name of Takanoiwa (noble rock), the taka (貴) coming from his stablemaster's ring name (as is the custom at the stable).

His debut was delayed one tournament while his visa was procured, and he debuted in maezumō in the January 2009 tournament along with fellow recruits Takageppō and Takatoshi. Proceeding him were graduates from Johoku High School (well known for its strong sumo program) Takarafuji, Kimikaze and Tokushōryū. He official debut was in the following March 2009 tournament where he managed a strong 5-2 record in the jonokuchi division. In the May 2009 tournament in the jonidan division, he would vie for the championship, logging a perfect 7-0 record and only losing on the final day in a play-off. After two winning tournaments in the sandanme division, in the November 2009 he took the championship in that division with a 7-0 record and playoff win. This allowed him promotion to the makushita third division, but he struggled in this division for an over a year, rarely achieving a winning tournament and in the midway through the May 2011 tournament he dropped out and also missed the following tournament. He was relegated back to sandanme but was not deterred and posted a 6-1 record his first tournament back which allowed him to be promoted back to makushita the very next tournament where he achieved a 6-1 record and participated in a three-man playoff for the championship, losing the second playoff match to future sekitori Chiyoōtori. His fortunes continued to improve and after four winning tournaments at makushita he was promoted to the salaried ranks of jūryō for the first time for the July 2012 tournament. After recording a winning 8-7 record, he had managed only two 7-8 tournaments after this. However, at the rank of jūryō 13, a rank low enough to face possible relegation if he did not perform well, he turned his fortunes around and took the championship in jūryō with a 12-3 record. After another five tournaments, achieving mostly winning records in jūryō he was finally promoted to the top tier makuuchi division for the January 2014 tournament.

Over the next two years Takanoiwa moved back and forth between the top two divisions. He was relegated after the May tournament but returned immediately after recording twelve wins in July. After two losing records he dropped back to jūryō but was promoted again after the March 2015 tournament. He again lasted only two tournaments before being relegated but was promoted for the fourth time after a kachi-koshi or winning record in November 2015. In January and March 2016 he achieved back-to-back winning records for the first time in the top division. In July he had his best performance to date in the top division, scoring 12–3 and finishing runner-up to Harumafuji. He was awarded his first special prize, for Fighting Spirit, and won promotion to his highest rank to date of maegashira 3 for the September 2016 tournament.

Losing records in the last two tournaments of 2016 saw him drop to maegashira 10 but he returned to form in January 2017. After compiling a 10-3 record he earned his first kinboshi on day 14 with force out (yorikiri) win over Hakuhō. Despite losing to Sokokurai on the final day he finished in a tie for third place and was awarded the special prize for Outstanding Performance.[1] He was promoted to his highest rank to date of maegashira 2 for the Haru tournament in March. He withdrew from the May 2017 tournament on the 12th day due to a thigh injury.[2]

He was injured during the Tottori stage of the regional tour in October, and was hospitalized from November 5 to November 9 in Fukuoka, reportedly with concussion and a fractured skull among other ailments.[3] He withdrew from the November 2017 tournament as a result. On November 14 it was reported that he had been assaulted with a beer bottle by yokozuna Harumafuji.[4] Harumafuji withdrew from the November tournament on the same day and did not deny the reports, saying "I sincerely apologize for causing trouble."[4] It later emerged that Takanoiwa's injuries were not as severe as first reported, with a doctor at the Fukuoka hospital who wrote the initial medical certificate submitted to the Japan Sumo Association by stablemaster Takanohana saying that there were no symptoms of skull fracture or brain fluid leakage, and that the "two weeks of recovery time" mentioned in the certificate should have started from the date of the incident in late October, not when the certificate was issued on November 9, meaning that Takanoiwa was cleared to enter the tournament.[5] Takanoiwa was questioned by Tottori prefectural police as part of their enquiry into the incident, which is alleged to have been sparked off by Takanoiwa disrespecting yokozuna Hakuhō by telling him that "your era is over" and playing with his cell phone while he was being reprimanded for his bad attitude.[6]

Fighting style[]

Takanoiwa is a yotsu-sumo wrestler who prefers grappling techniques to pushing and thrusting. His favoured grip on his opponent's mawashi or belt is migi-yotsu, a left hand outside, right hand inside position. He regularly uses his left hand outer grip to win by uwatenage, or overarm throw, but his most common winning kimarite is a straightforward yori-kiri, or force out.

Career record[]

Takanoiwa Yoshimori[7]
Year in sumo January
Hatsu basho, Tokyo
March
Haru basho, Osaka
May
Natsu basho, Tokyo
July
Nagoya basho, Nagoya
September
Aki basho, Tokyo
November
Kyūshū basho, Fukuoka
2009 (Maezumo) West Jonokuchi #26
5–2
 
East Jonidan #92
7–0–P
 
East Sandanme #85
6–1
 
West Sandanme #27
4–3
 
West Sandanme #14
7–0–P
Champion

 
2010 West Makushita #13
3–4
 
East Makushita #19
3–4
 
East Makushita #26
2–5
 
East Makushita #45
6–1
 
East Makushita #19
3–4
 
West Makushita #24
4–3
 
2011 East Makushita #21
3–4
 

Tournament Cancelled
0–0–0
West Makushita #30
1–2–4
 
West Makushita #44
Sat out due to injury
0–0–7
West Sandanme #22
6–1
 
East Makushita #42
6–1–PP
 
2012 East Makushita #17
5–2
 
West Makushita #6
5–2
 
West Makushita #1
4–3
 
East Jūryō #14
8–7
 
East Jūryō #10
7–8
 
East Jūryō #12
7–8
 
2013 East Jūryō #13
12–3
Champion

 
West Jūryō #4
8–7
 
East Jūryō #2
8–7
 
East Jūryō #1
7–8
 
East Jūryō #2
8–7
 
West Jūryō #1
8–7
 
2014 West Maegashira #15
7–8
 
West Maegashira #15
10–5
 
East Maegashira #12
3–12
 
East Jūryō #3
12–3
 
West Maegashira #11
7–8
 
East Maegashira #13
3–12
 
2015 West Jūryō #4
6–9
 
West Jūryō #6
11–4
 
East Maegashira #16
7–8
 
East Maegashira #16
6–9
 
West Jūryō #2
9–6
 
East Jūryō #1
8–7
 
2016 West Maegashira #13
9–6
 
East Maegashira #8
8–7
 
East Maegashira #6
5–10
 
East Maegashira #10
12–3
F
East Maegashira #3
5–10
 
West Maegashira #7
6–9
 
2017 East Maegashira #10
11–4
O
West Maegashira #2
6–9
 
East Maegashira #5
5–7–3
 
East Maegashira #7
6–9
 
East Maegashira #9
8–7
 
East Maegashira #8
Sat out due to injury
0–0–15
Record given as win-loss-absent    Top Division Champion Top Division Runner-up Retired Lower Divisions

Sanshō key: F=Fighting spirit; O=Outstanding performance; T=Technique     Also shown: =Kinboshi(s); P=Playoff(s)
Divisions: MakuuchiJūryōMakushitaSandanmeJonidanJonokuchi

Makuuchi ranks: YokozunaŌzekiSekiwakeKomusubiMaegashira

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ "Kisenosato boosts case for promotion to yokozuna". Japan Times Online. January 22, 2017. 
  2. ^ "Sumo: Hakuho stays in charge to move closer to 38th career title". The Mainichi. Retrieved 25 May 2017. 
  3. ^ "休場の貴ノ岩は脳振とう 頭部裂傷も、全治2週間" (in Japanese). Sankei. 13 November 2017. Retrieved 13 November 2017. 
  4. ^ a b "Yokozuna Harumafuji suspected of assaulting fellow wrestler with beer bottle: report". Japan Times. 14 November 2017. Retrieved 14 November 2017. 
  5. ^ "SUMO/ Mystery deepens over wrestler's injuries at hands of Harumafuji". Asahi Shimbun. 18 November 2017. Retrieved 20 November 2017. 
  6. ^ Fifield, Anna (20 November 2017). "Two sumo wrestlers walked into a bar. The brawl they had there is rocking Japan's sumo world". Washington Post. Retrieved 20 November 2017. 
  7. ^ "Takanoiwa Yoshimori Information". Sumo Reference. Retrieved 21 April 2016. 

External links[]