Robert Weber (astronomer)

Minor planets discovered: 8 [1]
8409 Valentaugustus 28 November 1995 list
11602 Miryang 28 September 1995 list
12005 Delgiudice 19 May 1996 list
23612 Ramzel 22 January 1996 list
26906 Rubidia 22 January 1996 list
37687 Chunghikoh 30 August 1995 list
39645 Davelharris 31 August 1995 list
(285178) 1996 OZ 18 July 1996 list

Robert Weber (1926–2008) was an American astronomer and discoverer of minor planets who ran the precursor to the LINEAR project shortly before his retirement in 1996. Data were collected by manually entering telescope pointing positions and requesting an image save. Searching twenty fields was a taxing experience. They did have automatic object detection working, but no starfield matching at that time.[2]

The inner main-belt asteroid 6181 Bobweber, discovered by Eleanor Helin at Palomar Observatory in 1986, was named in his honour on 21 March 2008. (M.P.C. 62353).[2][3]

Career[]

Weber graduated from the MIT Department of Physics in 1959,[4] and was with the MIT Lincoln Laboratory in Lexington for 34 years (1962–1996).[5] He also worked on sounding rockets, and interplanetary particles and fields with the Helios, Voyager, and IMP programmes.

He led the team that developed the prototype for the Air Force GEODSS deep space satellite tracking network (the two LINEAR telescopes are GEODSS assets that were originally destined for Portugal). He is also responsible for the project that led to the development of the CCID16 CCD chip used in the LINEAR cameras, a natural consequence of earlier work in solid state physics.

Discovered minor planets[]

Publications by Robert Weber[]

Confirmation of the following publications can be found at the following websites:

References[]

  1. ^ "Minor Planet Discoverers (by number)". Minor Planet Center. 4 September 2016. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  2. ^ a b "6181 Bobweber (1986 RW)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  3. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  4. ^ "404 error: File not found" (PDF).
  5. ^ "MIT's record-size retirement 'Class of 1996'".
  6. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 8409 Valentaugustus (1995 WB43)" (2016-05-30 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  7. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 11602 Miryang (1995 ST54)" (2016-06-13 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  8. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 12005 Delgiudice (1996 KA3)" (2015-12-14 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  9. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 23612 Ramzel (1996 BJ4)" (2015-07-17 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  10. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 26906 Rubidia (1996 BH4)" (2016-03-19 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  11. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 37687 Chunghikoh (1995 QB10)" (2016-08-11 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 September 2016.
  12. ^ "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 39645 Davelharris (1995 QC10)" (2016-01-13 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 26 September 2016.