Reverse dictionary

A reverse dictionary is a dictionary alphabetized by the reversal of each entry:

kcots (stock)
kcotseid (diestock)
kcotser (restock)
kcotsevil (livestock)

Another variant alphabetizes by suffix.[citation needed]

Before computers, reverse dictionaries were tedious to produce. The first computer-produced was Stahl and Scavnicky's A Reverse Dictionary of the Spanish Language, in 1974.[1]

Definition[]

In a reverse word dictionary, the entries are alphabetized by the last letter first, then next to last, and so on.[1][2] In them, words with the same suffix appear together. This can be useful for linguists and poets looking for words ending with a particular suffix, or by an epigrapher or forensics specialist examining a damaged text (e.g. a stone inscription, or a burned document) that had only the final portion of a word. Reverse dictionaries of this type have been published for most major alphabetical languages.

Applications[]

Applications of reverse word dictionaries include:

Construction[]

Reverse word dictionaries are straightforward to construct, by simply sorting based on reversed words. This was labor-intensive and tedious before computers, but is now straightforward. For example, using the Unix commands rev and sort allows the following one-liner program to produce a reverse dictionary of the file "dict":

rev < dict | sort | rev

By the same token, reverse dictionaries have become less important to the extent that online word lists can be searched dynamically.

Examples[]

English[]

Online[]

Physical[]

Other Languages[]

Akkadian[]

Czech[]

Dutch[]

Estonian[]

Finnish[]

French[]

German[]

Greek, modern[]

Hebrew[]

Hebrew and Aramaic[]

Hungarian[]

Indian, old[]

Italian[]

Latin[]

Macedonian[]

Manchu[]

Mongolian[]

Russian[]

Slovak[]

Slovene[]

Spanish[]

Turkish[]

Welsh[]

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ a b Stahl, Fred A., Scavnicky, Gary E. A., A Reverse Dictionary of the Spanish Language, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, IL,1974.
  2. ^ Walker, John, The rhyming dictionary of the English language: in which the whole language is arranged according to its terminations ..., Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1983.