Paulo Moura

Paulo Moura (15 July 1932 – 12 July 2010[1]) was a Brazilian clarinetist and saxophonist.

Born in São José do Rio Preto, where his father was the maestro of a marching band and encouraged his son to train as a tailor,[2] Paulo instead studied in the National Music School and performed with the Brazilian Symphonic Orchestra. He was the first black artist to become first clarinetist in the Municipal Theatre Orchestra.[2] He appeared at Bossa Nova night at Carnegie Hall in 1962 with Sérgio Mendes,[2] the two of them also featuring on Cannonball Adderley's 1962 album, Cannonball's Bossa Nova. He won the Sharp Award for the most popular instrumentalist of the year in 1992.[2]

His CD Paulo Moura e Os Oito Batutas was listed by Barnes & Noble as one of the top 10 recommendations of the year for 1998.[2] From 1997 to 1999, he was on the State Council of Culture in Rio de Janeiro, a Councillor of the Federal Council of Music, and President of the Museum Foundation of Image and Sound.[2] In 2000, Moura became the first Brazilian instrumentalist to win the Latin Grammy.[2] Moura died of lymphoma three days before his 78th birthday.[3][4] In his last informal musical gathering happened on July 10, 2010,[5] and included David Feldman (musician), pt:Daniela Spielmann, pt:Marcello Gonçalves, pt:Gabriel Moura, pt:Humberto Araujo and pt:Wagner Tiso. He was married to Halina Grynberg and had two sons, Pedro and Domingos.[6]

Discography[]

References[]

  1. ^ "MEMÓRIA: Paulo Moura silencia" Zero Hora in Portuguese, 15 July 2010
  2. ^ a b c d e f g "Paulo Moura". Cantaloupe Music Productions Inc. Archived from the original on December 1, 2005. Retrieved 2009-08-06.
  3. ^ "Músico Paulo Moura morre aos 77". Folha.com. 13 July 2010. Retrieved 13 July 2010.
  4. ^ "Interview with Seu Jorge" Exclaim! Magazine, August 2010 in Portuguese, 15 July 2010
  5. ^ "Sarau para Paulo Moura". Cantaloupe Music Productions. Retrieved 29 August 2016.
  6. ^ Phillips, Tom (22 July 2010). "Brazilian musician brought the bossa nova to the world". The Globe and Mail.

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