Olympic Athlete from Russia at the 2018 Winter Olympics

Olympic Athletes from Russia at the
2018 Winter Olympics
Refer to caption
IOC code OAR
in Pyeongchang, South Korea
9–25 February 2018
Competitors 168 in 15 sports
Flag bearer Volunteer
Medals
Ranked 13th
Gold
2
Silver
6
Bronze
9
Total
17
Winter Olympics appearances (overview)
Other related appearances

 Soviet Union (1956–1988)
 Unified Team (1992)
 Russia (1994–2014)


 Independent Olympians
Vladimir Putin, the President of Russia, meets Russian athletes on 31 January 2018

Olympic Athlete from Russia (OAR) is the International Olympic Committee's (IOC) designation of select Russian athletes permitted to participate in the 2018 Winter Olympics in Pyeongchang, South Korea. The designation was instigated following the suspension of the Russian Olympic Committee after the Olympic doping controversy. This was the first time since the Unified Team of 1992 that Russian athletes had participated under the neutral Olympic flag.

During the 2018 Winter Olympics, two athletes from this team tested positive for banned substances and were found guilty of doping by the Court of Arbitration for Sport (CAS). Both were sanctioned by the IOC and their results were annulled as a consequence of the ruling.

Background[]

Russian doping allegations[]

In December 2014, German public broadcaster ARD aired a documentary which made wide-ranging allegations that Russia organized a state-run doping program which supplied their athletes with performance-enhancing drugs.[1] In November 2015, the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) published a report and the International Association of Athletics Federations (IAAF) suspended Russia indefinitely from world track and field events.[2]

In May 2016, The New York Times published allegations by the former director of Russia's anti-doping laboratory, Dr. Grigory Rodchenkov, that a conspiracy of corrupt anti-doping officials, Federal Security Service (FSB) intelligence agents, and compliant Russian athletes used banned substances to gain an unfair advantage during the Games. Rodchenkov stated that the FSB tampered with over 100 urine samples as part of a cover-up, and that a third of the Russian medals won at Sochi were the result of doping.[3][4][5] On 18 July 2016, an independent investigation commissioned by WADA concluded that it was shown "beyond a reasonable doubt" that the RUSADA, the Ministry of Sport, the FSB and the Centre of Sports Preparation of the National Teams of Russia had "operated for the protection of doped Russian athletes" within a "state-directed failsafe system" using "the disappearing positive [test] methodology". According to the McLaren Report, the Disappearing Positive Methodology operated from "at least late 2011 to August 2015". It was used on 643 positive samples, a number that the authors consider "only a minimum" due to limited access to Russian records.[6]

On 9 December 2016, Canadian lawyer Richard McLaren published the second part of his independent report. The investigation found that from 2011 to 2015, more than 1,000 Russian competitors in various sports (including summer, winter, and Paralympic sports) benefited from the cover-up.[4][5][7] Following the release of the McLaren report, the IOC announced the initiation of an investigation of 28 Russian athletes at the Sochi Olympic Games. La Gazzetta dello Sport reported the names of 17 athletes, of whom 15 are among the 28 under investigation.[8] As of late December 2017, 13 medals had been stripped and 43 Russian athletes had been disqualified for competition in 2018.[9] The number of athletes under investigation rose to 36 (and eventually 46) in December.[10]

Russia has denied the existence of a doping program with the President of Russia, Vladimir Putin, blaming the United States for "using the Olympics to meddle in the Russian presidential election".[11]

Official sanctions[]

Approved OAR logo

On 5 December 2017, the IOC announced that the Russian Olympic Committee had been suspended from the 2018 Winter Olympics with immediate effect. Athletes who had no previous drug violations and a consistent history of drug testing were to be allowed to compete under the Olympic Flag as an "Olympic Athlete from Russia" (OAR).[12] Under the terms of the decree, Russian government officials were barred from the Games, and neither the country's flag nor anthem would be present (the Olympic Flag and Olympic Anthem would be used instead).[13] On 20 December 2017 the IOC proposed an alternative logo for the OAR athletes' uniforms (shown on right).[14] IOC President Thomas Bach said that "after following due process [the IOC] has issued proportional sanctions for this systematic manipulation while protecting the clean athletes".[15]

As of January 2018, the IOC had sanctioned 43 Russian athletes from the 2014 Winter Olympics and banned them from competing in the 2018 ion and all other future Olympic Games as part of the Oswald Commission. All but one of these athletes appealed against their bans to CAS. The court overturned the sanctions on 28 athletes, meaning that their Sochi medals and results were reinstated, but decided that there was sufficient evidence against eleven of the athletes to uphold their Sochi sanctions. The IOC said in a statement that "the result of the CAS decision does not mean that athletes from the group of 28 will be invited to the Games. Not being sanctioned does not automatically confer the privilege of an invitation" and that "this [case] may have a serious impact on the future fight against doping". The IOC were careful to note that the CAS Secretary General "insisted that the CAS decision does not mean that these 28 athletes are innocent" and that they would consider an appeal against the court's decision. The court also decided that none of the 39 athletes should be banned from all future Olympic Games, but only the 2018 Games. Three of the 42 Russian athletes that originally appealed are still waiting for their hearing, which will be conducted after the 2018 Games.[16]

An original pool of 500 Russian athletes was put forward for consideration for the 2018 Games and 111 were immediately removed from consideration. The remaining athletes had to meet pre-games conditions such as further pre-games tests and reanalysis from stored samples. Only if these requirements were met would the athletes be considered for invitation to the Games. None of the athletes who had been sanctioned by the Oswald Commission were still in the pool at this stage.[17] The final number of neutral Russian athletes invited to compete was 169[18] and, after speed skater Olga Graf dropped out, the eventual total was 168.

Reaction in Russia[]

Russian Prime Minister Dmitry Medvedev with medal winners from Russia, 28 February 2018

In the past, the Russian president Vladimir Putin and other officials had stated that it would be an embarrassment for Russia if its athletes were not allowed to compete under the Russian flag.[19] However, his spokesman later revealed that no boycott had actually been discussed prior to the IOC's decision.[12] After the announcement, Ramzan Kadyrov, the head of Chechnya, announced that none of the Chechen athletes would be permitted to participate under a neutral flag.[20]

On 6 December, Putin stated that his government were prepared to allow Russian athletes to compete at the Games as individuals, but there were still calls from other Russian politicians for a boycott.[21][22] Gennady Zyuganov, leader of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation, proposed to send fans to the Games with a Soviet Victory Banner.[23] Sergey Lavrov, the Russian Minister of Foreign Affairs, suggested that the United States "fears honest competition";[24] while Vladimir Putin was of the opinion that the United States had used its influence within the IOC to "orchestrate the doping scandal".[25] He called the IOC decision an unfair "collective punishment", saying "It all looks like an absolutely orchestrated and politically motivated decision. For me, there are no doubts about this."[26]

The popular Russian newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda reported that 86% of Russians opposed participating in the Olympics under a neutral flag.[27] Despite the OAR designation, many Russian fans still attended the Games, wearing the Russian colours and chanting "Россия!" ("Russia!") in unison, in an act of defiance against the ban.[28] After the games, Russian figure skater Evgenia Medvedeva revealed in an Instagram post that the Russian tricolor was hidden on the OAR medal ceremony uniforms underneath a white fur scarf buttoned on the front of the jacket.[29]

Criticism[]

The International Ice Hockey Federation voiced support for allowing the full participation of "all clean Russian athletes" in the 2018 Winter Games,[30] calling on the IOC to refrain from imposing "collective punishment".[31]

The IOC's decision was heavily criticized by Jack Robertson, who was primary investigator of the Russian doping program on behalf of WADA. Robertson argued that the IOC had issued "a non-punitive punishment meant to save face while protecting the [IOC's] and Russia's commercial and political interests". He also highlighted the fact that Russian whistleblowers proved beyond doubt that "99 percent of [their] national-level teammates were doping". According to Robertson, "[WADA] has discovered that when a Russian athlete [reaches] the national level, he or she [has] no choice in the matter: [it is] either dope, or you're done". He added "There is currently no intelligence I have seen or heard about that indicates the state-sponsored doping program has ceased."[32] It was also reported that Russian officials intensively lobbied US politicians in an apparent attempt to secure Dr. Grigory Rodchenkov's extradition to Russia (Rodchenkov being the main whistleblower).[33]

The CAS decision to overturn the life bans of 28 Russian athletes and restore their medals was fiercely criticised by Olympic officials, including IOC president Thomas Bach who said the decision was "extremely disappointing and surprising". Whistleblower Rodchenkov's lawyer stated that "the CAS decision would allow doped athletes to escape without punishment",[34] also that "[the CAS decision] provides yet another ill-gotten gain for the corrupt Russian doping system generally, and Putin specifically".[35]

Failed doping tests[]

Curler Alexander Krushelnitskiy failed his doping test after winning bronze in the mixed doubles curling as he tested positive for meldonium. This is a drug used for treating heart conditions such as angina, chronic heart failure, cardiomyopathy and other cardiovascular disorders. It has the effect of increasing blood flow and can lead to an improvement in endurance. Meldonium was placed on WADA's list of substances banned from use by athletes two years previously.[36] Krushelnitskiy's wife and mixed doubles curling partner Anastasia Bryzgalova tested negative for meldonium, but they were both forced by the IOC to return their bronze medals since CAS had found Krushelnitskiy guilty of doping.[37] He would later announce his decision not to contest the IOC's ruling, but reserved the right to challenge the suspension should the investigation conclude "no fault or negligence".[38] Norway was subsequently awarded the bronze medal for the mixed doubles curling event.

Nadezhda Sergeeva, a bobsleigh pilot, tested positive for trimetazidine, a drug used for treating angina and which is also included in WADA’s list of banned substances. She placed 12th in the women's competition, but had passed her drug test five days before the first runs were held at the start of the event.[39]

Medalists[]

Competitors[]

The following is the list of number of competitors that could participate at the Games per sport/discipline.

Sport Men Women Total
Alpine skiing 3 2 5
Biathlon 2 2 4
Bobsleigh 6 4 10
Cross-country skiing 7 5 12
Curling 1 6 7
Figure skating 7 8 15
Freestyle skiing 10 12 22
Ice hockey 25 23 48
Luge 7 1 8
Nordic combined 1 0 1
Short track speed skating 3 4 7
Skeleton 2 0 2
Ski jumping 4 4 8
Snowboarding 9 7 16
Speed skating 1 2 3
Total 88 80 168

Alpine skiing[]

Russia has qualified three male and two female skiers.[40]

Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Aleksandr Khoroshilov Men's slalom 49.72 21 51.01 5 1:40.73 17
Ivan Kuznetsov Men's slalom DNF
Men's giant slalom DNF
Pavel Trikhichev Men's combined DNF
Anastasiia Silanteva Women's giant slalom 1:15.67 32 1:12.28 29 2:27.95 30
Ekaterina Tkachenko Women's slalom 53.22 34 53.33 33 1:46.55 32
Mixed
Athlete Event Round of 16 Quarterfinals Semifinals Final / BM
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Opposition
Result
Rank
Aleksandr Khoroshilov
Ivan Kuznetsov
Anastasiia Silanteva
Ekaterina Tkachenko
Team  Norway (NOR)
L 0–4
Did not advance

Biathlon[]

Based on their Nations Cup rankings in the 2016–17 Biathlon World Cup, Russia has qualified 6 men and 5 women. However, the IOC only invited 2 men and 2 women.[41]

Athlete Event Time Misses Rank
Anton Babikov Men's sprint 25:48.5 4 (3+1) 57
Men's pursuit 37:21.8 4 (1+1+2+0) 40
Men's individual 50:08.0 1 (0+0+1+0) 16
Matvey Eliseev Men's sprint 26:59.3 5 (3+2) 83
Men's individual 51:07.1 3 (0+2+0+1) 28
Tatiana Akimova Women's sprint 22:24.2 0 (0+0) 20
Women's pursuit 33:50.8 4 (1+1+0+2) 31
Women's individual 44:17.6 2 (0+1+0+1) 15
Women's mass start 41:32.4 6 (0+0+5+1) 30
Uliana Kaisheva Women's sprint 22:58.5 2 (1+1) 33
Women's pursuit 36:33.6 5 (0+2+2+1) 52
Women's individual 44:47.9 2 (0+2+0+0) 24
Anton Babikov
Matvey Eliseev
Tatiana Akimova
Uliana Kaisheva
Mixed relay 1:10:49.1 0+6 0+4 9

Bobsleigh[]

Based on their rankings in the 2017–18 Bobsleigh World Cup, Russia has qualified 6 sleds.[42][43][44]

Men
Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Maxim Andrianov*
Yury Selikhov
Two-man 50.27 28 50.58 29 49.98 26 Eliminated 2:30.83 28
Vasiliy Kondratenko
Alexey Stulnev*
49.77 19 49.99 20 49.74 20 49.87 20 3:19.37 20
Maxim Andrianov*
Ruslan Samitov
Yury Selikhov
Alexey Zaitsev
Four-man 49.43 18 49.39 12 49.56 15 49.56 4 3:17.94 15
Women
Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Yulia Belomestnykh
Aleksandra Rodionova*
Two-woman 51.29 17 51.47 17 51.41 15 51.55 17 3:25.72 17
Anastasia Kocherzhova
Nadezhda Sergeeva*
51.01 10 51.49 18 51.29 12 51.37 14 3:25.16 DSQ

* – Denotes the driver of each sled

Cross-country skiing[]

Russia qualified 12 athletes, seven male and five female.[45]

Distance
Men
Athlete Event Classical Freestyle Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Deficit Rank
Aleksandr Bolshunov 50 km classical N/A 2:08:40.8 +18.7 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Aleksey Chervotkin N/A 2:13:19.0 +4:56.9 12
Andrey Larkov 15 km freestyle N/A 35:25.1 +1:41.2 20
30 km skiathlon 41:37.5 31 36:38.0 29 1:18:50.6 +2:30.6 30
50 km classical N/A 2:10:59.6 +2:37.5 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Andrey Melnichenko 15 km freestyle N/A 35:02.1 +1:18.2 14
30 km skiathlon 41:46.4 32 36:30.1 24 1:18:50.5 +2:30.5 29
Denis Spitsov 15 km freestyle N/A 34:06.9 +23.0 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
30 km skiathlon 40:35.0 13 35:26.5 3 1:16:32.7 +12.7 4
50 km classical N/A 2:16:24.6 +8:02.5 20
Alexey Vitsenko 15 km freestyle N/A 36:46.4 +3:02.5 49
30 km skiathlon 41:09.2 20 36:20.6 22 1:18:02.2 +1:42.2 23
Aleksandr Bolshunov
Aleksey Chervotkin
Andrey Larkov
Denis Spitsov
4 × 10 km relay N/A 1:33:14.3 +9.4 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Women
Athlete Event Classical Freestyle Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Deficit Rank
Yulia Belorukova 15 km skiathlon 22:02.5 22 20:15.9 22 42:51.0 +2:06.1 18
Anna Nechaevskaya 10 km freestyle N/A 26:24.8 +1:24.3 10
Natalia Nepryaeva 15 km skiathlon 21:28.2 11 19:21.6 8 41:17.9 +33.0 8
30 km classical N/A 1:32:10.4 +9:52.8 24
Anastasia Sedova 10 km freestyle N/A 26:07.8 +1:07.3 8
15 km skiathlon 21:43.8 19 19:43.2 12 41:57.7 +1:12.8 12
30 km classical N/A 1:26:46.8 +4:29.2 11
Alisa Zhambalova 10 km freestyle N/A 26:57.8 +1:57.3 17
15 km skiathlon 22:34.9 28 19:51.9 15 42:59.1 +2:14.2 21
30 km classical N/A 1:27:27.2 +5:09.6 15
Yulia Belorukova
Anna Nechaevskaya
Natalia Nepryaeva
Anastasia Sedova
4 × 5 km relay N/A 52:07.6 +43.3 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Sprint
Men
Athlete Event Qualification Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Total Rank Total Rank Total Rank Total Rank
Aleksandr Bolshunov Sprint 3:10.20 3 Q 3:08.45 1 Q 3:06.63 3 q 3:07.11 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Andrey Melnichenko 3:22.27 48 Did not advance
Alexander Panzhinskiy 3:11.63 6 Q 3:11.15 4 q 3:19.05 6 Did not advance
Alexey Vitsenko 3:14.56 14 Q 3:30.72 5 Did not advance
Aleksandr Bolshunov
Denis Spitsov
Team sprint N/A 15:58.84 1 Q 15:57.97 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Women
Athlete Event Qualification Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Total Rank Total Rank Total Rank Total Rank
Yulia Belorukova Sprint 3:18.26 15 Q 3:14.29 1 Q 3:10.12 1 Q 3:07.21 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Natalia Nepryaeva 3:15.65 6 Q 3:11.78 1 Q 3:10.72 3 q 3:12.98 4
Alisa Zhambalova 3:31.53 44 Did not advance
Yulia Belorukova
Natalia Nepryaeva
Team sprint N/A 16:24.63 3 q 16:41.76 9

Curling[]

Summary
Team Event Group stage Tiebreaker Semifinal Final / BM
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Victoria Moiseeva
Uliana Vasilyeva
Galina Arsenkina
Julia Guzieva
Yulia Portunova
Women's tournament United Kingdom GBR
L 3–10
China CHN
W 7–6
Sweden SWE
L 4–5
United States USA
L 6–7
Japan JPN
L 5–10
Switzerland SUI
L 2–11
Denmark DEN
W 8–7
South Korea KOR
L 2–11
Canada CAN
L 8–9
9 Did not advance
Anastasia Bryzgalova
Alexander Krushelnitskiy
Mixed doubles United States USA
L 3–9
Norway NOR
W 4–3
Finland FIN
W 7–5
China CHN
W 6–5
South Korea KOR
W 6–5
Canada CAN
L 2–8
Switzerland SUI
L 8–9
N/A 3 Q BYE Switzerland SUI
L 5–7
Norway NOR
L (DSQ)
DSQ

Women's[]

Russia has qualified their women's team (five athletes), by finishing in the top seven teams in Olympic Qualification points.[46] The representatives were determined at the 2017 Russian Olympic Curling Trials.

The Russian team consists of Victoria Moiseeva, Uliana Vasilyeva, Galina Arsenkina, Julia Guzieva, and Yulia Portunova.

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Country
Skip W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 South Korea Kim Eun-jung 8 1 75 44 41 34 5 15 79%
 Sweden Anna Hasselborg 7 2 64 48 42 34 14 13 83%
 Great Britain Eve Muirhead 6 3 61 56 39 38 12 6 79%
 Japan Satsuki Fujisawa 5 4 59 55 38 36 10 13 75%
 China Wang Bingyu 4 5 57 65 35 38 12 5 78%
 Canada Rachel Homan 4 5 68 59 40 36 10 12 81%
 Switzerland Silvana Tirinzoni 4 5 60 55 34 37 12 7 78%
 United States Nina Roth 4 5 56 65 38 39 7 6 78%
 Olympic Athletes from Russia Victoria Moiseeva 2 7 45 76 34 40 8 6 76%
 Denmark Madeleine Dupont 1 8 50 72 32 41 10 6 73%
Round-robin

The Olympic Athletes from Russia team has a bye in draws 3, 7 and 10.

Mixed doubles[]

Russia has qualified a mixed doubles team by earning enough points in the last two World Mixed Doubles Curling Championships.[47]

There were no trials as the team was chosen by the Russian Olympic Committee.

The Olympic Athletes from Russia team won the mixed doubles bronze medal game against Norway, but due to a positive testing of meldonium from Alexander Krushelnitskiy, their bronze medals were stripped and given to Norway.[48]

Final round robin standings

Key
Teams to playoffs
Teams to tiebreaker
Country
Athletes W L PF PA Ends
won
Ends
lost
Blank
ends
Stolen
ends
Shot %
 Canada Kaitlyn Lawes / John Morris 6 1 52 26 28 20 0 9 80%
 Switzerland Jenny Perret / Martin Rios 5 2 45 40 29 26 0 10 71%
 Olympic Athletes from Russia Anastasia Bryzgalova / Alexander Krushelnitskiy 4 3 36 44 26 27 1 7 67%
 Norway Kristin Skaslien / Magnus Nedregotten 4 3 39 43 26 25 1 8 74%
 China Wang Rui / Ba Dexin 4 3 47 42 27 27 1 6 72%
 South Korea Jang Hye-ji / Lee Ki-jeong 2 5 40 40 23 29 1 7 67%
 United States Rebecca Hamilton / Matt Hamilton 2 5 37 43 26 25 0 9 74%
 Finland Oona Kauste / Tomi Rantamäki 1 6 35 53 23 29 0 6 67%

Semifinal

Monday, February 12, 20:05

Sheet C 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Final
 Olympic Athletes from Russia (Bryzgalova / Krushelnitskiy) 0 2 0 0 2 1 0 0 5
 Switzerland (Perret / Rios) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 2 0 1 1 0 0 2 1 7
Bronze Medal Game

Tuesday, February 13, 9:05

Sheet B 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 Final
 Olympic Athletes from Russia (Bryzgalova / Krushelnitskiy) Hammer (Last Stone First End) 2 1 0 2 0 1 1 1 L
 Norway (Skaslien / Nedregotten) 0 0 2 0 2 0 0 0 W
Notes


Figure skating[]

Russia qualified 15 figure skaters (7 male, 8 female), based on its placement at the 2017 World Figure Skating Championships in Helsinki, Finland.[49]

Individual
Athlete Event SP FS Total
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
Dmitri Aliev Men's singles 98.98 5 Q 168.53 13 267.51 7
Mikhail Kolyada 86.69 8 Q 177.56 7 264.25 8
Evgenia Medvedeva Ladies' singles 81.61 2 Q 156.65 1 238.26 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Maria Sotskova 63.86 12 Q 134.24 7 198.10 8
Alina Zagitova 82.92 WR 1 Q 156.65 2 239.57 1st, gold medalist(s)
Mixed
Athlete Event SP / SD FS / FD Total
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
Kristina Astakhova / Alexei Rogonov Pairs 70.52 10 Q 123.93 13 194.45 12
Evgenia Tarasova / Vladimir Morozov 81.68 2 Q 143.25 4 224.93 4
Natalia Zabiiako / Alexander Enbert 74.35 8 Q 138.53 7 212.88 7
Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev Ice dancing 75.47 6 Q 111.45 4 186.92 5
Tiffany Zahorski / Jonathan Guerreiro 66.47 13 Q 95.77 14 162.24 13

Team event

Athlete Event Short program/Short dance Free skate/Free dance
Men's Ladies' Pairs Ice dance Total Men's Ladies' Pairs Ice dance Total
Points

Team points

Points

Team points

Points

Team points

Points

Team points

Points Rank Points

Team points

Points

Team points

Points

Team points

Points

Team points

Points Rank
Mikhail Kolyada (M)
Evgenia Medvedeva (L) (SP)
Evgenia Tarasova / Vladimir Morozov (P) (SP)
Ekaterina Bobrova / Dmitri Soloviev (ID)
Natalia Zabiiako / Alexander Enbert (P) (FS)
Alina Zagitova (L) (FS)
Team event 74.36
3
81.06
WR
10
80.92
10
74.76
8
31 2 Q 173.57
9
158.08
10
133.28
8
110.43
8
66 2nd, silver medalist(s)

Freestyle skiing[]

Aerials
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Jump 1 Jump 2 Jump 1 Jump 2 Jump 3
Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank Points Rank
Ilya Burov Men's aerials 123.98 8 126.55 1 Q 122.13 6 Q 123.53 6 Q 122.17 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Maxim Burov 117.65 12 116.37 9 Did not advance
Pavel Krotov 124.89 5 QF Bye 126.11 2 Q 124.89 5 Q 103.17 4
Stanislav Nikitin 70.59 25 111.06 12 Did not advance
Alina Gridneva Women's aerials 60.16 20 60.98 15 Did not advance
Liubov Nikitina 88.83 8 84.24 4 Q 85.68 7 Q 80.01 7 Did not advance
Alexandra Orlova 102.22 1 QF Bye 89.28 5 Q 61.25 8 Did not advance
Kristina Spiridonova 97.64 4 QF Bye 57.64 11 Did not advance
Halfpipe
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Best Rank
Pavel Chupa Men's halfpipe 46.80 25.80 46.80 24 Did not advance
Valeriya Demidova Women's halfpipe 71.00 73.60 73.60 10 Q 79.00 80.60 77.60 80.60 5
Moguls
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Run 1 Run 2 Run 3
Time Points Total Rank Time Points Total Rank Time Points Total Rank Time Points Total Rank Time Points Total Rank
Alexandr Smyshlyaev Men's moguls 24.78 65.61 83.93 2 Q Bye 25.49 60.18 74.57 15 Did not advance
Marika Pertakhiya Women's moguls 30.37 56.65 70.43 12 36.98 24.59 30.92 7 Q 30.52 58.04 71.65 16 Did not advance
Regina Rakhimova 31.74 59.54 71.77 11 31.95 60.82 72.82 4 Q 30.92 60.42 73.58 11 Q 30.87 60.34 73.55 10 Did not advance
Ekaterina Stolyarova 30.82 54.42 67.69 20 30.63 59.92 73.40 2 Q 30.52 59.62 73.23 12 Q 30.48 59.09 72.74 11 Did not advance
Ski cross
Athlete Event Seeding 1/8 final Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
Semen Denshchikov Men's ski cross 1:10.86 27 2 Q 3 Did not advance
Egor Korotkov 1:10.39 23 4 Did not advance
Igor Omelin 1:10.24 17 3 Did not advance
Sergey Ridzik 1:09.21 2 2 Q 1 Q 2 FA 3 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Anastasiia Chirtcova Women's ski cross 1:15.83 15 2 Q DNF Did not advance
Victoria Zavadovskaya 1:16.80 19 3 Did not advance

Qualification legend: FA – Qualify to medal round; FB – Qualify to consolation round

Slopestyle
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Best Rank
Lana Prusakova Women's slopestyle 42.20 70.60 70.60 14 Did not advance
Anastasia Tatalina 27.40 81.00 81.00 8 Q 29.30 51.20 13.00 51.20 12

Ice hockey[]

Summary

Key:

Team Event Group stage Qualification
playoff
Quarterfinal Semifinal / Pl. Final / BM / Pl.
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Opposition
Score
Rank
Olympic Athletes from Russia Men's tournament  Slovakia
L 2–3
 Slovenia
W 8–2
 United States
W 4–0
1 QQ Bye  Norway
W 6–1
 Czech Republic
W 3–0
 Germany
W 4–3 OT
1st, gold medalist(s)
Olympic Athletes from Russia Women's tournament  Canada
L 0–5
 United States
L 0–5
 Finland
L 1–5
4 N/A   Switzerland
W 6–2
 Canada
L 0–5
 Finland
L 2–3
4

Men's tournament[]

Russia men's national ice hockey team qualified by finishing second in the 2015 IIHF World Ranking.[50]

In the first Olympics since 1994 that did not feature any active NHL players, the Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR) team, consisting primarily of SKA and CSKA players of a Russia-based KHL and featuring ex-NHL all-stars Pavel Datsyuk, Ilya Kovalchuk and Vyacheslav Voynov (all SKA), won the gold medal, after a 4–3 overtime victory over the German team in the final. In its post-Olympics World Ranking, the IIHF counted this as a result for the Russian team.[51] The IIHF considers this victory to be Russia's second gold medal in the Olympics, as they also attributed the 1992 Unified Team gold medal to Russia.[52] However, the IOC does not attribute either of these results to Russia.[1]

Team roster

The following is the Olympic Athletes from Russia roster for the men's ice hockey tournament at the 2018 Winter Olympics.[53]

Head coach: Russia Oleg Znarok     Assistant coaches: Latvia Harijs Vītoliņš, Russia Rashit Davydov, Russia Igor Nikitin, Russia Alexei Zhamnov

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2017–18 team
2 D Artyom Zub 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 90 kg (198 lb) 3 October 1995 Khabarovsk Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
4 D Vladislav Gavrikov 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 97 kg (214 lb) 21 November 1995 Yaroslavl Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
7 F Ivan Telegin 1.93 m (6 ft 4 in) 90 kg (198 lb) 28 February 1992 Novokuznetsk Russia HC CSKA Moscow (KHL)
10 F Sergei Mozyakin 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 84 kg (185 lb) 30 March 1981 Yaroslavl, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia Metallurg Magnitogorsk (KHL)
11 F Sergei AndronovA 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 96 kg (212 lb) 19 July 1989 Penza, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia HC CSKA Moscow (KHL)
13 F Pavel DatsyukC 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 20 July 1978 Sverdlovsk, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
21 F Sergey Kalinin 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 17 March 1991 Omsk, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
25 F Mikhail Grigorenko 1.91 m (6 ft 3 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 16 May 1994 Khabarovsk Russia HC CSKA Moscow (KHL)
26 D Vyacheslav Voynov 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 15 January 1990 Chelyabinsk, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
28 D Andrei Zubarev 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 101 kg (223 lb) 3 March 1987 Ufa, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
29 F Ilya Kablukov 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 88 kg (194 lb) 18 January 1988 Moscow, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
30 G Igor Shestyorkin 1.86 m (6 ft 1 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 30 December 1995 Moscow Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
31 G Ilya Sorokin 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 80 kg (176 lb) 4 August 1995 Mezhdurechensk Russia HC CSKA Moscow (KHL)
44 D Egor Yakovlev 1.82 m (6 ft 0 in) 87 kg (192 lb) 17 September 1991 Magnitogorsk, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
52 F Sergei Shirokov 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in) 89 kg (196 lb) 10 March 1986 Moscow, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
53 D Alexey Marchenko 1.88 m (6 ft 2 in) 96 kg (212 lb) 2 January 1992 Moscow Russia HC CSKA Moscow (KHL)
55 D Bogdan Kiselevich 1.84 m (6 ft 0 in) 94 kg (207 lb) 14 February 1990 Cherepovets, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia HC CSKA Moscow (KHL)
71 F Ilya KovalchukA 1.90 m (6 ft 3 in) 103 kg (227 lb) 15 April 1983 Kalinin, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
74 F Nikolai Prokhorkin 1.89 m (6 ft 2 in) 91 kg (201 lb) 17 September 1993 Chelyabinsk Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
77 F Kirill Kaprizov 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 87 kg (192 lb) 26 April 1997 Novokuznetsk Russia HC CSKA Moscow (KHL)
83 G Vasily Koshechkin 2.00 m (6 ft 7 in) 110 kg (243 lb) 27 March 1983 Tolyatti, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia Metallurg Magnitogorsk (KHL)
87 F Vadim Shipachyov 1.85 m (6 ft 1 in) 86 kg (190 lb) 12 March 1987 Cherepovets, Russian SFSR, Soviet Union Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
89 D Nikita Nesterov 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 83 kg (183 lb) 28 March 1993 Chelyabinsk Russia HC CSKA Moscow (KHL)
94 F Alexander Barabanov 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in) 89 kg (196 lb) 17 June 1994 Saint Petersburg Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
97 F Nikita Gusev 1.80 m (5 ft 11 in) 82 kg (181 lb) 8 July 1992 Moscow Russia SKA Saint Petersburg (KHL)
Preliminary round
Pos Team Pld W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1 Olympic Athletes from Russia 3 2 0 0 1 14 5 +9 6 Quarterfinals
2  Slovenia 3 0 2 0 1 8 12 −4 4[a] Qualification playoffs
3  United States 3 1 0 1 1 4 8 −4 4[a]
4  Slovakia 3 1 0 1 1 6 7 −1 4[a]
Source: IIHF
Notes:
  1. ^ a b c Slovenia 4 Pts; USA 4 Pts; Slovakia 1 Pts. Slovenia defeated USA 3–2 in overtime.
14 February 2018
21:10
Slovakia 3–2
(2–2, 0–0, 1–0)
Olympic Athletes from RussiaGangneung Hockey Centre, Pyeongchang
Attendance: 4,025

16 February 2018
16:40
Olympic Athletes from Russia 8–2
(2–0, 4–1, 2–1)
 SloveniaGangneung Hockey Centre, Pyeongchang
Attendance: 6,018

17 February 2018
21:10
Olympic Athletes from Russia 4–0
(1–0, 2–0, 1–0)
 United StatesGangneung Hockey Centre, Pyeongchang
Attendance: 6,473
Quarterfinal
21 February 2018
16:40
Olympic Athletes from Russia 6–1
(3–0, 2–1, 1–0)
 NorwayGangneung Hockey Centre, Pyeongchang
Attendance: 3,553
Semifinal
23 February 2018
16:40
Czech Republic 0–3
(0–0, 0–2, 0–1)
Olympic Athletes from RussiaGangneung Hockey Centre, Pyeongchang
Attendance: 4,330
Final
25 February 2018
13:10
1st, gold medalist(s) Olympic Athletes from Russia 4–3 OT
(1–0, 0–1, 2–2)
(OT 1–0)
 Germany 2nd, silver medalist(s)Gangneung Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 5,075

Women's tournament[]

Russia women's national ice hockey team qualified by finishing 4th in the 2016 IIHF World Ranking.[50]

Team roster

The following is the Olympic Athletes from Russia roster for the women's ice hockey tournament at the 2018 Winter Olympics.[54]

Head coach: Russia Alexei Chistyakov     Assistant coach: Russia Alexander Vedernikov

No. Pos. Name Height Weight Birthdate Birthplace 2017–18 team
1 G Valeria Tarakanova 1.83 m (6 ft 0 in) 89 kg (196 lb) 20 June 1998 Zavolzhye Russia SKIF Nizhny Novgorod (RWHL)
2 D Angelina Goncharenko 1.78 m (5 ft 10 in) 73 kg (161 lb) 23 May 1994 Moscow Russia HC Tornado (RWHL)
10 F Liudmila Belyakova 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 65 kg (143 lb) 12 August 1994 Moscow Russia HC Tornado (RWHL)
11 D Liana Ganeyeva 1.65 m (5 ft 5 in) 62 kg (137 lb) 20 December 1997 Staroe Baisarovo Russia Arktik-Universitet Ukhta (RWHL)
12 D Yekaterina Lobova 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 64 kg (141 lb) 25 October 1998 Novosibirsk Russia Biryusa Krasnoyarsk (RWHL)
13 D Nina Pirogova 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 68 kg (150 lb) 26 January 1999 Moscow Russia HC Tornado (RWHL)
15 F Valeria Pavlova 1.79 m (5 ft 10 in) 82 kg (181 lb) 15 April 1995 Tyumen Russia Biryusa Krasnoyarsk (RWHL)
17 F Fanuza Kadirova 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 58 kg (128 lb) 6 April 1998 Kukmor Russia Arktik-Universitet Ukhta (RWHL)
18 F Olga SosinaC 1.63 m (5 ft 4 in) 75 kg (165 lb) 27 July 1992 Almetyevsk Russia Agidel Ufa (RWHL)
22 D Maria BatalovaA 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 67 kg (148 lb) 3 May 1996 Russia HC Tornado (RWHL)
28 F Diana Kanayeva 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 63 kg (139 lb) 27 March 1997 Naberezhnye Chelny Russia Dynamo St. Petersburg (RWHL)
31 G Nadezhda Alexandrova 1.72 m (5 ft 8 in) 63 kg (139 lb) 3 January 1986 Moscow, Soviet Union Russia HC Tornado (RWHL)
34 D Svetlana Tkacheva 1.69 m (5 ft 7 in) 56 kg (123 lb) 3 November 1984 Moscow, Soviet Union Russia HC Tornado (RWHL)
43 F Yekaterina Likhachyova 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 63 kg (139 lb) 24 August 1998 Kirovo-Chepetsk Russia SKIF Nizhni Novgorod (RWHL)
44 F Alyona Starovoitova 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 67 kg (148 lb) 22 October 1999 Moscow Russia HC Tornado (RWHL)
59 F Yelena DergachyovaA 1.59 m (5 ft 3 in) 55 kg (121 lb) 8 November 1995 Moscow Russia HC Tornado (RWHL)
68 F Alevtina Shtaryova 1.73 m (5 ft 8 in) 67 kg (148 lb) 9 February 1997 Moscow Russia HC Tornado
73 F Viktoria Kulishova 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 60 kg (132 lb) 12 August 1999 Tyumen Russia SKIF Nizhny Novgorod (RWHL)
76 D Yekaterina Nikolayeva 1.67 m (5 ft 6 in) 65 kg (143 lb) 5 October 1995 Saratov Russia Dynamo St. Petersburg (RWHL)
88 F Yekaterina Smolina 1.62 m (5 ft 4 in) 62 kg (137 lb) 8 October 1988 Ust-Kamenogorsk, Kazakh SSR, Soviet Union Russia Dynamo St. Petersburg (RWHL)
92 G Nadezhda Morozova 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 85 kg (187 lb) 29 November 1996 Moscow Russia Biryusa Krasnoyarsk (RWHL)
94 F Yevgenia Dyupina 1.71 m (5 ft 7 in) 62 kg (137 lb) 30 June 1994 Glazov Russia Dynamo St. Petersburg (RWHL)
97 F Anna Shokhina 1.70 m (5 ft 7 in) 69 kg (152 lb) 23 June 1997 Novosinkovo Russia HC Tornado (RWHL)
Preliminary round
Pos Team Pld W OTW OTL L GF GA GD Pts Qualification
1  Canada 3 3 0 0 0 11 2 +9 9 Semifinals
2  United States 3 2 0 0 1 9 3 +6 6
3  Finland 3 1 0 0 2 7 8 −1 3 Quarterfinals
4 Olympic Athletes from Russia 3 0 0 0 3 1 15 −14 0
Source: IIHF
11 February 2018
21:10
Canada 5–0
(0–0, 3–0, 2–0)
Olympic Athletes from RussiaKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 3,912

13 February 2018
21:10
United States 5–0
(1–0, 3–0, 1–0)
Olympic Athletes from RussiaKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 3,797

15 February 2018
16:40
Olympic Athletes from Russia 1–5
(0–1, 0–2, 1–2)
 FinlandKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 3,353
Quarterfinal
17 February 2018
12:10
Olympic Athletes from Russia 6–2
(1–0, 2–2, 3–0)
  SwitzerlandKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 3,903
Semifinal
19 February 2018
21:10
Canada 5–0
(1–0, 1–0, 3–0)
Olympic Athletes from RussiaGangneung Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 3,396
Bronze medal game
21 February 2018
16:40
3rd, bronze medalist(s) Finland 3–2
(1–0, 2–1, 0–1)
Olympic Athletes from RussiaKwandong Hockey Centre, Gangneung
Attendance: 3,217

Luge[]

Based on the results from the World Cups during the 2017–18 Luge World Cup season, Russia qualified 8 sleds (10 athletes).[55] However, only 8 athletes (7 men and 1 woman) are set to join the pool of Olympic Athletes from Russia (OAR) after the accration commission of the International Olympic Committee (IOC).[56]

Men
Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Semen Pavlichenko Singles 48.337 24 47.923 12 47.716 8 47.883 15 3:11.859 14
Roman Repilov 47.776 4 47.740 3 47.948 15 47.644 5 3:11.108 8
Stepan Fedorov 48.035 13 47.936 13 47.755 9 47.882 14 3:11.608 13
Vladislav Antonov
Alexander Denisyev
Doubles 46.437 11 46.344 11 N/A 1:32.781 11
Andrei Bogdanov
Andrei Medvedev
47.106 19 46.402 12 N/A 1:33.508 16
Women
Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Ekaterina Baturina Singles 47.122 21 46.700 16 46.675 12 47.122 17 3:07.619 15
Mixed team relay
Athlete Event Women Men Doubles Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Ekaterina Baturina
Roman Repilov
Vladislav Antonov
Alexander Denisyev
Team relay 47.523 9 48.615 1 49.211 7 2:25.349 7

Nordic combined[]

Athlete Event Ski jumping Cross-country Total
Distance Points Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Ernest Yahin Normal hill/10 km 96.0 96.7 21 26:18.3 43 28:34.3 38
Large hill/10 km 127.5 114.1 15 25:56.1 43 27:35.1 35

Short track speed skating[]

According to the ISU Special Olympic Qualification Rankings, Russia has qualified 5 men and 5 women.[57] However, only 7 athletes (3 men and 4 women) received an invitation from the IOC.[58]

Men
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Semion Elistratov 500 m 40.829 3 Did not advance
1000 m 1:23.979 2 Q 1:23.893 1 Q 1:26.773 4 FB 1:27.621 6
1500 m 2:13.087 3 Q N/A 2:11.003 1 FA 2:10.687 3rd, bronze medalist(s)
Pavel Sitnikov 500 m PEN Did not advance
1000 m PEN Did not advance
1500 m 2:33.653 4 N/A Did not advance
Aleksandr Shulginov 500 m 40.585 2 Q 54.498 4 Did not advance
1000 m 1:31.133 4 Did not advance
1500 m 2:19.308 6 N/A Did not advance
Women
Athlete Event Heat Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Ekaterina Efremenkova 1000 m 1:29.598 2 Q 1:29.466 3 Did not advance
1500 m PEN N/A Did not advance
Emina Malagich 500 m 56.830 3 Did not advance
Sofia Prosvirnova 500 m 43.376 1 Q 43.466 1 Q 43.219 3 FB 5
1000 m PEN N/A Did not advance
1500 m 2:25.553 4 N/A Did not advance
Ekaterina Konstantinova
Emina Malagich
Sofia Prosvirnova
Ekaterina Efremenkova
3000 m relay N/A 4:21.973 4 FB 4:08.838 5

Qualification legend: ADV – Advanced due to being impeded by another skater; FA – Qualify to medal round; FB – Qualify to consolation round; AA – Advance to medal round due to being impeded by another skater

Skeleton[]

Based on the world rankings, Russia qualified 5 sleds.[59][60] However, only 2 athletes (2 men) received an invitation from the IOC.

Athlete Event Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Run 4 Total
Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank Time Rank
Nikita Tregubov Men's 50.59 2 50.50 4 50.53 5 50.56 2 3.22.18 2nd, silver medalist(s)
Vladislav Marchenkov 51.27 15 51.49 20 51.05 13 51.37 15 3.25.18 15

Ski jumping[]

Men
Athlete Event Qualification First round Final Total
Distance Points Rank Distance Points Rank Distance Points Rank Points Rank
Evgeni Klimov Normal hill 102.0 121.4 12 Q 94.5 99.0 30 Q 81.5 69.2 30 168.2 30
Large hill 136.0 111.8 16 Q 125.0 116.4 24 Q 118.0 104.2 26 220.6 26
Denis Kornilov Normal hill 94.5 107.2 28 Q 107.5 113.9 16 Q 96.5 95.7 28 209.6 24
Large hill 129.0 101.7 26 Q 122.5 111.2 29 Q 110.5 85.1 30 196.3 30
Mikhail Nazarov Normal hill 88.5 93.7 41 Q 94.5 92.1 34 Did not advance
Large hill 122.0 92.3 33 Q 120.0 103.4 39 Did not advance
Alexey Romashov Normal hill 90.0 98.5 34 Q 94.0 91.7 37 Did not advance
Large hill 136.0 108.9 21 Q 119.0 99.8 42 Did not advance
Evgeni Klimov
Denis Kornilov
Mikhail Nazarov
Alexey Romashov
Team large hill N/A 474.5 409.6 7 Q 473.0 400.2 7 809.8 7
Women
Athlete Event First round Final Total
Distance Points Rank Distance Points Rank Points Rank
Irina Avvakumova Normal hill 99.0 114.7 4 Q 102.0 116.0 5 230.7 4
Anastasiya Barannikova 88.0 83.7 17 Q 82.0 65.3 29 149.0 27
Alexandra Kustova 85.0 77.3 21 Q 85.5 75.0 28 152.3 24
Sofia Tikhonova 86.5 75.0 24 Q 86.0 75.8 25 150.8 25

Snowboarding[]

Freestyle
Athlete Event Qualification Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Rank Run 1 Run 2 Run 3 Best Rank
Nikita Avtaneev Men's halfpipe 63.25 32.75 63.25 20 Did not advance
Vlad Khadarin Men's big air 83.75 79.25 83.75 11 Did not advance
Men's slopestyle 23.05 64.16 64.16 11 Did not advance
Anton Mamaev Men's big air 29.00 42.75 42.75 16 Did not advance
Sofya Fyodorova Women's big air 64.00 23.25 64.00 21 Did not advance
Women's slopestyle Canceled[61] 27.53 65.73 CAN 65.73 8
Parallel
Athlete Event Qualification Round of 16 Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Time Rank Opposition
Time
Opposition
Time
Opposition
Time
Opposition
Time
Rank
Dmitry Loginov Men's giant slalom 1:31.00 32 Did not advance
Dmitry Sarsembaev 1:25.74 14 Q  Lee S-h (KOR)
L +0.54
Did not advance
Andrey Sobolev 1:25.99 18 Did not advance
Vic Wild 1:25.51 9 Q  Fischnaller (ITA)
L +0.93
Did not advance
Milena Bykova Women's giant slalom 1:33.09 9 Q  Ulbing (AUT)
L +0.52
Did not advance
Natalia Soboleva 1:33.93 19 Did not advance
Ekaterina Tudegesheva 1:33.42 14 Q  Jörg (GER)
L +0.65
Did not advance
Alena Zavarzina 1:30.16 2 Q  Kotnik (SLO)
W -0.03
 Zogg (SUI)
W -1.88
 Jörg (GER)
L DNF
 Hofmeister (GER)
L +4.07
4
Snowboard cross
Athlete Event Seeding 1/8 final Quarterfinal Semifinal Final
Run 1 Run 2 Best Seed
Time Rank Time Rank Position Position Position Position Rank
Daniil Dilman Men's snowboard cross 1:15.40 25 1:16.11 =8 1:15.40 31 4 Did not advance
Nikolay Olyunin 1:13.78 4 Bye 1:13.78 4 1 Q 1 Q DNF FB DNS 11
Kristina Paul Women's snowboard cross 1:21.93 19 1:19.93 2 1:19.93 14 N/A 2 Q DNF FB DNF 12
Mariya Vasiltsova 1:20.57 12 Bye 1:20.57 12 N/A DNF Did not advance

Qualification legend: FA – Qualify to medal round; FB – Qualify to consolation round

Speed skating[]

Russia earned the following quotas at the conclusion of the four World Cup's used for qualification.[62]

Athlete Event Race
Time Rank
Sergey Trofimov Men's 1500 m 1:46.69 18
Angelina Golikova Women's 500 m 37.62 7
Women's 1000 m 1:16.85 22
Natalia Voronina Women's 3000 m 4:05.85 10
Women's 5000 m 6:53.98 3rd, bronze medalist(s)

See also[]

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