Mount Lemmon Observatory

Mount Lemmon Observatory
View of the telescopes on the Mount Lemmon summit
View of the telescopes on Mount Lemmon
Alternative namesMLO Edit this at Wikidata
OrganizationSteward Observatory
Observatory code G84 Edit this on Wikidata
LocationMount Lemmon, Arizona
Coordinates32°26′31″N 110°47′21″W / 32.4420°N 110.7893°W / 32.4420; -110.7893Coordinates: 32°26′31″N 110°47′21″W / 32.4420°N 110.7893°W / 32.4420; -110.7893
Altitude2,791 meters (9,157 ft)
Established1970 (1970)
WebsiteSteward Observatory
Telescopes
Steward Observatory Telescope1.5 m reflector
UMN MLOF telescope1.5 m reflector
CSS telescope1.0 m reflector
KASI telescope1.0 m reflector
Mount Lemmon Observatory is located in the United States
Mount Lemmon Observatory
Location of Mount Lemmon Observatory
Commons page Related media on Wikimedia Commons

Mount Lemmon Observatory (MLO), also known as the Mount Lemmon Infrared Observatory, is an astronomical observatory located on Mount Lemmon in the Santa Catalina Mountains approximately 28 kilometers (17 mi) northeast of Tucson, Arizona (US). The site in the Coronado National Forest is used with special permission from the U.S. Forest Service by the University of Arizona's Steward Observatory, and contains a number of independently managed telescopes.[1]

History[]

The MLO site was first developed in 1954 as Mount Lemmon Air Force Station, a radar installation of the Air Defense Command.[2] Upon transfer to the Steward Observatory 1970, the site was converted to an infrared observatory.[1] Until 2003, a radar tower operated from Fort Huachuca was used to track launches from the White Sands Missile Range in New Mexico and Vandenberg Air Force Base in California.[3]

Telescopes[]

Below are the 8 telescopes currently operating at the observatory.

Comet ISON (C/2012 S1) as seen on October 8, 2013 with the Schulman Telescope (recorded with STX-16803 CCD camera)

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ a b c d e Kuiper, Gerard P. (1972-12-31). "NO. 172 The Lunar and Planetary Laboratory and its Telescopes" (PDF). University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory. Retrieved 2012-01-16.[permanent dead link]
  2. ^ "Air Defense Radar Stations Information for Mount Lemmon AFS, AZ". Online Air Defense Radar Museum. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  3. ^ a b "Mt. Lemmon Infrared Observatory". Astronomy Camp. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  4. ^ "Steward Observatory 60" Telescope". University of Arizona Department of Astronomy and Steward Observatory. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  5. ^ a b Sonett, C. P. (1976). "University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences and Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona. Observatory report covering the period from 1 October 1974 to 30 September 1975". Bulletin of the Astronomical Society. 8: 11. Bibcode:1976BAAS....8...11S.
  6. ^ Hubbard, William B. (1978). "University of Arizona, Department of Planetary Sciences/Lunar and Planetary Laboratory, Tucson, Arizona. Report from 1 October 1976 to 30 September 1977". Bulletin of the Astronomical Society. 10: 16. Bibcode:1978BAAS...10...16H.
  7. ^ "Camp Facilities and Telescopes". Astronomy Camp. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  8. ^ "JPL". NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL).
  9. ^ Ney, E. P. (1975). "University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, Minnesota. Observatory report". Bulletin of the Astronomical Society. 7: 150. Bibcode:1975BAAS....7..150N.
  10. ^ "Mount Lemon Observing Facility". University of California, San Diego Center for Astrophysics & Space Sciences. August 17, 2006. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  11. ^ Beshore, Ed. "The followup problem". Retrieved 2012-01-16.[permanent dead link]
  12. ^ Stiles, Lori (January 7, 2009). "Catalina Sky Survey Sets New Record for NEO Discoveries, Receives Funding Through 2012". The University of Arizona Office of University Communications. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  13. ^ Han, Wonyong; Mack, Peter; Lee, Chung-Uk; Park, Jang-Hyun; Jin, Ho; Kim, Seung-Lee; Kim, Ho-Il; Yuk, In-Soo; Lee, Woo-Baik; et al. (2005). "Development of a 1-m Robotic Telescope System". Publications of the Astronomical Society of Japan. 57 (5): 821. Bibcode:2005PASJ...57..821H. doi:10.1093/pasj/57.5.821.
  14. ^ a b "Arizona's Largest Public-Only Telescope Now at UA's SkyCenter". The University of Arizona Office of University Communications. October 22, 2010. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  15. ^ "RCOS: 32 inch Carbon Truss Telescope". RC Optical Systems, Inc. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  16. ^ "Mount Lemmon SkyCenter Astronomer Takes 'Astronomy Picture of the Day'". The University of Arizona Office of University Communications. August 19, 2008. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  17. ^ "RCOS: 24 inch Carbon Truss Telescope". RC Optical Systems, Inc. Retrieved 2012-01-16.
  18. ^ Stiles, Lori (November 18, 2005). "Jamieson Telescope Will Light Infrared Universe for Amateur Astronomers". The University of Arizona Office of University Communications. Retrieved 2012-01-16.

External links[]