List of fastest production cars by acceleration

This list is limited to unmodified production cars which meet the eligibility criteria below. All entries must be able to be verified from reliable sources.

Eligible cars[]

Because of the inconsistencies with the various definitions of production cars, dubious claims by manufacturers and self-interest groups, and inconsistent or changing application of the definitions, this list has a defined set of requirements. For further explanation of how these were arrived at see the links above.

Production car definition[]

For the purposes of this list a production car is defined as:

  1. Being constructed principally for retail sale to consumers for their personal use, and to transport people on public roads (no commercial or industrial vehicles are eligible);
  2. Fitted with the original manufacturer-supplied road tires;
  3. Having had 25 or more instances made by the original vehicle manufacturer and offered for commercial sale to the public in new condition (cars modified by either professional tuners or individuals are not eligible);
  4. Being street-legal in their intended markets and capable of passing any official tests or inspections required to be granted this status.

By 0–60 mph (0–97 km/h) time (3.0 seconds or less)[]

If an independent time becomes available, that time will be listed over the manufacturer's time regardless if the latter is quicker or slower. Many elements change how fast the car can accelerate to 97 km/h (60 mph).[i] [ii] Tires, elevation above sea level, weight of the driver, testing equipment, weather conditions and surface of testing track all influence these times.[3] One-foot rollout before the timer starts is industry standard in North America so measurements which exclude the first foot of acceleration are allowed. After Car and Driver switched to one-foot rollout in 2019 they updated some previous times (about 0.1 second faster than the approximation in the original tests).[1][2][4]

Car[iii] Model Year[iv] Time[v] Independent time[vi] Manufacturer time[vii] Noted specs[viii]
Porsche 918 Spyder[ix] 2015 2.1 sec 2.1 sec[5] 2.5 sec[6] Limited to 918 produced, hybrid-electric, naturally aspirated
Tesla Model S P100D w/Ludicrous+ Update[x] 2017[xi] 2.28 sec 2.28 sec[xii][8] 2.4 sec[9][10] All-electric, with 5(+2) seats
Lamborghini Huracán Performante[ix] 2018 2.3 sec 2.3 sec[11] 2.9 sec[12] Naturally aspirated
Porsche Taycan Turbo S[x] 2020 2.4 sec 2.4 sec[13][14][15] 2.6 sec[16] All-electric, with 4(+1) seats
Nissan GT-R Nismo[ix] 2020 2.48 sec 2.48 sec[17] 2.5 sec[18][19] Front-engine, usually with 2+2 seats
Bugatti Chiron[ix] 2017 2.5 sec 2.5 sec[20][21] 2.4 sec[22][23] Limited to 500 produced
Tesla Model S Performance w/Ludicrous Mode[x] 2020 2.5 sec 2.5 sec[24] 2.3 sec[25] All-electric, with 5 seats
Lamborghini Aventador SVJ[ix] 2019 2.5 sec 2.5 sec[26] 2.8 sec[27] Limited to 963 produced, naturally aspirated
Porsche 911 GT2 RS (991) 2018 2.5 sec 2.5 sec[28][29] 2.7 sec[30] Rear-engine
Bugatti Veyron and Veyron Super Sport[ix] 2005 2.5 sec 2.5 sec[31][32] 2.5 sec[33][34] Limited to 450 produced[xiii]
Porsche 911 Turbo S (991 and 991.2)[ix] 2014 2.5 sec 2.5 sec[35][36][37] 2.8 sec[38] Rear-engine, with 2+2 seats
McLaren 720S 2018 2.5 sec 2.5 sec[39] 2.9 sec[40]
Lamborghini Huracán[ix] 2015 2.5 sec 2.5 sec[41] 3.2 sec[42] Naturally aspirated
Porsche 911 Turbo S (992)[ix] 2020 2.5 sec 2.5 sec[43] 2.6 sec[44] Rear-engine, with 2+2 seats
Dodge Challenger SRT Demon 2018 2.6 sec 2.6 sec[45] 2.1 sec[xiv][46][47][48] Limited to 3300 produced, front-engine, with 1(+4) seats
Tesla Model X Performance w/Ludicrous Mode[xv] 2020 2.6 sec n/a 2.6 sec[49] All-electric, with 5 to 7 seats
Lamborghini Aventador SV[ix] 2015 2.6 sec 2.6 sec[50] 2.8 sec[51] Limited to 600 produced, naturally aspirated
Tesla Model S P90D w/Ludicrous Upgrade[x] 2015 2.6 sec 2.6 sec[52] 2.8 sec[53] All-electric, with 5(+2) seats
McLaren P1 2015 2.6 sec 2.6 sec[54] 2.8 sec[55] Limited to 375 produced, hybrid-electric
BMW M5 Competition[xvi] 2019 2.6 sec 2.6 sec[56][57] 3.1 sec[58] Front-engine, with 5 seats
Audi R8 V10 Plus[ix] 2017 2.6 sec 2.6 sec[59] 3.2 sec[60] Naturally aspirated
Nissan GT-R[ix] 2014 2.7 sec 2.7 sec[61] 2.7 sec[62] Front-engine, usually with 2+2 seats
Porsche 911 Turbo S (997)[ix] 2011 2.7 sec 2.7 sec[63][64] 3.1 sec[65] Rear-engine, with 2+2 seats
Lamborghini Aventador[ix] 2012 2.7 sec 2.7 sec[66] 2.9 sec[67] Naturally aspirated
McLaren 650S 2015 2.7 sec 2.7 sec[68] 2.9 sec[69]
Ferrari 488 Pista 2019 2.7 sec 2.7 sec[70] 2.85 sec[71]
Chevrolet Corvette Stingray Z51 2020 2.8 sec 2.8 sec[72] 2.9 sec[73] Naturally aspirated
Caterham 7 620 R 2013 2.8 sec 2.8 sec[74] 2.8 sec[75] Front-engine
BAC Mono 2012 2.8 sec n/a 2.8 sec[76] Naturally aspirated, with 1 seat
Porsche Panamera Sport Turismo Turbo S E-Hybrid 2018 2.8 sec 2.8 sec[77] 3.2 sec[78] Hybrid-electric with 4+1 seats
Porsche 911 GT3 RS (991.2) 2019 2.8 sec 2.8 sec[79] 3.0 sec[80] Rear-engine, naturally aspirated
Ferrari 812 Superfast 2018 2.8 sec 2.8 sec[81] 2.9 sec[82] Front-engine
Tesla Model X Performance w/Ludicrous Mode[xv] 2019 2.86 sec 2.86 sec[83] 2.6 sec[84] All-electric, with 5 to 7 seats
Ferrari LaFerrari 2015 2.9 sec n/a[xvii] 2.9 sec[88] Limited to 499 produced, hybrid-electric, naturally aspirated
Ferrari F12tdf 2016 2.9 sec n/a 2.9 sec[89] Limited to 799 produced, naturally aspirated
McLaren 12C 2012 2.9 sec 2.9 sec[90] 3.1 sec[91]
Tesla Model X P100D w/Ludicrous+ Update[xv] 2016[xi] 2.9 sec 2.9 sec[92] 2.8 sec[9][10][93] All-electric, with 5 to 7 seats
Porsche 911 Carrera S 2020 2.9 sec 2.9 sec[94] 3.2 sec[95]
Honda NSX[ix] 2020 3.0 sec 3.0 sec[96] 2.7 sec[97] Hybrid-electric
Ford GT 2017 3.0 sec 3.0 sec[98] <3.0 sec[99]
Tesla Model 3 Performance[x] 2018 3.0 sec 3.0 sec[100] 3.2 sec[101] All-electric, with 5 seats
Mercedes-AMG E 63 S 4MATIC+[xviii] 2018 3.0 sec 3.0 sec[102] 3.4 sec[103] Front-engine, with 5 seats
Ariel Atom 500 (V8) 2010 3.0 sec 3.0 sec[104] 2.3 sec[105][106] Limited to 25 produced
Mercedes-AMG GT S 2016 3.0 sec 3.0 sec[107] 3.7 sec[108]
Chevrolet Corvette Z06 2015 3.0 sec 3.0 sec[109] 2.95 sec[110]
McLaren 675LT 2016 3.0 sec 3.0 sec[111] 2.8 sec[112] Limited to 1000 produced[xix]

By 1/4 mile or 400 metre times (11 seconds or less)[ii][]

Car[iii] Year[iv] Time[v] Noted specs[viii]
Bugatti Veyron Super Sport[ix] 2010 9.7 sec[34] Limited to 30 produced
McLaren P1 2015 9.8 sec at 239.6 km/h (148.9 mph)[54] Limited to 375 produced, hybrid-electric
Porsche 918 Spyder[ix] 2015 9.8 sec at 238.6 km/h (148.3 mph)[113][114][115] Limited to 918 produced, hybrid-electric, naturally aspirated
McLaren 720S 2018 9.9 sec at 238.5 km/h (148.2 mph)[116][xx]
Bugatti Chiron[ix] 2016 9.99 sec at 242.5 km/h (150.7 mph)[117] Limited to 500 produced
Bugatti Veyron[ix] 2006 10.1 sec at 228.5 km/h (142 mph)[31] Limited to 420 produced
Ferrari 488 Pista 2019 10.1 sec[70]
Porsche 911 GT2 RS (991) 2018 10.2 sec at 225.3 km/h (140 mph)[28] Rear-engine
Lamborghini Huracán Performante[ix] 2018 10.2 sec at 218.9 km/h (136 mph)[11] Naturally aspirated
Porsche 911 Turbo S (992)[ix] 2020 10.2 sec[118] Rear-engine, with 2+2 seats
Lamborghini Aventador SVJ[ix] 2019 10.3 sec at 219.5 km/h (136.4 mph)[26] Limited to 963 produced, naturally aspirated
Lamborghini Aventador SV[ix] 2015 10.4 sec at 216.8 km/h (134.7 mph)[26] Limited to 600 produced, naturally aspirated
McLaren 650S 2015 10.4 sec at 219.0 km/h (136.1 mph)[68]
Lamborghini Aventador[ix] 2012 10.4 sec at 218.9 km/h (136 mph)[66][119] Naturally aspirated
Lamborghini Huracán[ix] 2015 10.4 sec at 217.3 km/h (135 mph)[41] Naturally aspirated
Tesla Model S Performance w/Ludicrous Mode[x] 2019 10.45 sec at 203.2 km/h (126.25 mph)[120] All-electric, with 5 seats
Porsche Taycan Turbo S[x] 2020 10.47 sec at 210.3 km/h (130.7 mph)[14][15] All-electric, with 4(+1) seats
Porsche 911 Turbo S (991.2)[ix] 2017 10.48 sec at 212.1 km/h (131.8 mph)[37][35][15] Rear-engine, with 2+2 seats
McLaren 675LT 2015 10.5 sec at 224.8 km/h (139.7 mph)[111] Limited to 1000 produced[xix]
Ferrari 812 Superfast 2018 10.5 sec[81]
Tesla Model S P100D w/Ludicrous+ Update[x] 2017[xi] 10.51 sec at 201.2 km/h (125 mph)[15] All-electric, with 5(+2) seats
Audi R8 V10 Plus[ix] 2016 10.6 sec at 212.4 km/h (132 mph)[59][121] Naturally aspirated
Dodge Challenger SRT Demon 2018 10.7 sec [48][xxi] Limited to 3300 produced, front-engine, with 1(+4) seats
McLaren 12C 2012 10.7 sec at 215.7 km/h (134 mph)[90]
Ferrari 458 Speciale 2014 10.7 sec[127] Naturally aspirated
McLaren F1 1995 10.8 sec at 142 miles per hour (229 km/h)[128][129][xxii]
Nissan GT-R 2013 10.8 sec[62][130] Front engine, usually with 2+2 seats
Ford GT 2017 10.8 sec at 216.6 km/h (134 mph)[98]
Corvette C7 ZR1 2019 10.8 sec at 214.2 km/h (133.1 mph)[131]
Ferrari F12tdf 2016 10.8 sec[citation needed] Limited to 799 produced, naturally aspirated
Tesla Model S P90D w/Ludicrous Upgrade[x] 2016 10.8 sec at 196.3 km/h (121.99 mph)[132] All-electric, with 5(+2) seats
BMW M5 Competition[xvi] 2019 10.8 sec at 209.2 km/h (130 mph)[133] Front-engine, with 5 seats
Dodge Viper SRT-10 2008 10.9 sec at 208.9 km/h (129.8 mph)[134]
Porsche 911 Turbo S (997)[ix] 2011 10.9 sec at 205.0 km/h (127.4 mph)[64] Rear-engine, with 2+2 seats
Pagani Huayra 2013 10.9 sec[135] Limited to 100 produced
McLaren 570S 2016 10.9 sec at 220.5 km/h (137 mph)[136]
Chevrolet Corvette Z06[xxiii] 2016 10.9 sec at 213.6 km/h (132.7 mph)[119]
Porsche Carrera GT 2003 10.97 sec[137]
Ferrari LaFerrari 2015 11.0 sec at 228.12 km/h (141.75 mph)[138][xxiv] Limited to 499 produced, hybrid-electric, naturally aspirated

By 0–100 km/h (0–62 mph) time (3.0 seconds or less)[]

These are standing start acceleration times measured by independent, reliable sources. (no rollout allowed)

Car[iii] Engine/Motor Power Year[xxv] Time[v] Noted specs[viii]
Porsche 911 Turbo S (992) 478 kW (641 hp; 650 PS) 2020 2.5 sec[139] Rear-engine, with 2+2 seats
Porsche 918 Spyder 652 kW (875 hp; 887 PS) 2013 2.53 sec[140] Limited to 918 produced, hybrid-electric, naturally aspirated
Lamborghini Huracán Performante 471 kW (632 hp; 640 PS) 2017 2.6 sec[141] Naturally aspirated
Bugatti Veyron Super Sport 883 kW (1,184 hp; 1,200 PS) 2010 2.7 sec[142][143] Limited to 30 produced
Porsche 911 Turbo S (991.2) 427 kW (572 hp; 580 PS) 2016 2.7 sec[144][145] Rear-engine, with 2+2 seats
Porsche 911 GT2 RS (991) 515 kW (691 hp; 700 PS) 2017 2.7 sec[146] Rear-engine
McLaren 720S 530 kW (710 hp; 720 PS) 2017 2.7 sec[147]
Porsche Taycan Turbo S 560 kW (751 hp; 761 PS) 2019 2.7 sec[148] All-electric, with 4(+1) seats
Porsche 911 Turbo S (991) 412 kW (553 hp; 560 PS) 2013 2.8 sec[149] Rear-engine, with 2+2 seats
Audi R8 V10 Plus 449 kW (602 hp; 610 PS) 2015 2.8 sec[150] Naturally aspirated
Lamborghini Aventador SV 552 kW (740 hp; 750 PS) 2015 2.8 sec[151][152] Naturally aspirated
Bugatti Veyron 736 kW (987 hp; 1,001 PS) 2005 2.84 sec[153][154]
BMW M5 Competition 460 kW (617 hp; 625 PS) 2018 2.9 sec[148] Front-engine, with 5 seats
Ferrari 488 Pista 530 kW (710 hp; 720 PS) 2018 2.9 sec[155]
Tesla Model S Performance w/Ludicrous Mode 449 kW (603 hp; 611 PS) 2019 2.9 sec[148] All-electric, with 5 seats
McLaren 675LT 496 kW (666 hp; 675 PS) 2015 3.0 sec[156] Limited to 1000 produced[xix]
Ferrari 812 Superfast 588 kW (789 hp; 800 PS) 2017 3.0 sec[157] Front-engine
Mercedes-AMG GT 63 S 4MATIC+ 470 kW (630 hp; 639 PS) 2018 3.0 sec[158][159] Front-engine, with 2+2 seats
Nissan GT-R Nismo 441 kW (591 hp; 600 PS) 2018 3.0 sec[160] Front-engine, with 2+2 seats

Table notes[]

  1. ^ Various factors can contribute to variability in car speed test results. British and U.S. car measurements quote 0–60 miles/hour and 1/4 mile times while European car measurements quote 0–100 kilometers/hour and 400 meter times (which translate to 0–96.5606 kilometers/hour and 402.336 meter times, or to 0–62.1371 miles/hour and 1/4.02336 mile times, respectively)
  2. ^ a b Most measurements exclude an initial "rollout",[1] which according to Car and Driver "can affect the elapsed time by as much as 0.3 second".[2] Furthermore, environmental conditions change how fast the car drives (tires, surface of testing track, elevation above sea level, weight of the driver, and equipment used for testing are all critical). Times sourced for example by Car and Driver, are modified artificially using computer software after the drive test is complete, to theoretically account for how the car would have performed differently given different weather conditions.[3]
  3. ^ a b c Car models similar to an already mentioned model but differentiated only by minor package options (for example "convertible ions") are omitted acknowledging that speed results with those ions can be only slightly less fast. In the case of a tie between two cars, since there exist a variety of different opinions regarding the interpretation of, for example, 1/4 mile trap speed results, the car shown first is the one with the earlier model year (of the fast time's represented model, and not necessarily of any driven car) or if both years are the same it goes to the car having the earliest date associated with the performance data's verification or publishing.
  4. ^ a b This is the earliest model year of the car that can claim all its following listed data. This is not necessarily the model year of any driven car, the year when testing was performed, the year during which owners took first delivery of the model, the year it was unveiled, or when it was built.
  5. ^ a b c This is the fastest result provided by independent sources or the manufacturer.
  6. ^ This is the fastest result provided by independent sources.
  7. ^ This is the result claimed by the manufacturer.
  8. ^ a b c These cars usually have, unless otherwise stated, some combination of 2 seats and a forced induction gasoline mid-engine. Some are produced in limited number (associated with an increase in value), and those limited production numbers, if any, are stated.
  9. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab all-wheel drive
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i all-wheel drive, sedan
  11. ^ a b c Tesla vehicles don’t have traditional model years per se in the sense of design revisions being pushed out annually. For Tesla, the "model year" of any given car is the same as the calendar year that the car was produced but changes and updates, both in hardware and software, are pushed out whenever they are deemed ready. That said, for the purposes of this list, the "earliest model year of the car that can claim all its following listed data" (as per the note at the top of the "Year" column) is technically 2016 for the Model S P100D and the Model X P100D since that is when the 100kWh battery option was introduced even though the software update that made it possible to achieve the times currently listed was only released in 2017. All instances of the Model S P100D and Model X P100D are capable of claiming all their respective listed data if their software are updated to at least the revision which includes the "Ludicrous+" code. No modification by either professional tuners or individuals is necessary.
  12. ^ Time includes rollout; time without rollout is 2.53 sec[7]
  13. ^ of which 30 were Super Sport
  14. ^ factory claimed 2.1 sec used rollout; factory claim without rollout is 2.3 sec.
  15. ^ a b c all-wheel drive, SUV
  16. ^ a b 8-speed automatic, all wheel drive, twin turbocharged, sedan
  17. ^ Ferrari didn't allow standard tests on neutral ground for the LaFerrari, the acceleration numbers in the magazines were obtained downhill on the Ferrari test track with a specially prepared car on Ferrari's terms. Motor Trend´s LaFerrari report published a 9.7 second 1/4 mile only after each 9.9 second result was rewritten to account for weather, and it also revealed that standard car tests performed by Motor Trend involve multiple runs, driving forward in both directions to then compute averages, stating, "Fiorano’s downhill front straight was the only place we were allowed to do acceleration runs, and we couldn’t run backward for a two-way average. The data shows the fastest quarter-mile run declining by 18.2 feet from start to finish, or 1.4 percent. For reference, the National Hot Rod Association allows a 1.0 percent maximum grade over the course of a quarter mile. It’s difficult to say how much of an advantage this gives the LaFerrari, but it helps enough that we’ll asterisk these results until we can test a car on level ground". 0-60 mph in 3.6 sec and 1/4 mile of 11.03 sec @ 141.75 mph were measured on neutral ground.[85][86][87]
  18. ^ 9-speed automatic, all wheel drive, twin turbocharged, sedan
  19. ^ a b c including Coupé and Spider combined
  20. ^ Standard Pirelli PZero Corsa tires.
  21. ^ Dodge didn't allow independent magazine testers to use their own measuring equipment or turn on dragstrip timers, the best Road & Track could get was 2.6 seconds to 60 mph and 10.7 for the quarter-mile, Motor Trend got 11.0 as best time self-reported from the car.[122][123][124][125][126]
  22. ^ 400m test
  23. ^ 8-speed automatic, non-Z07
  24. ^ 9.7 sec at 148.5–149.1 mph published downhill 1.4% slope at Ferrari Test Track, 11.03 sec at 141.75 mph measured on neutral ground[87]
  25. ^ First production year or the year of the last update/facelift affecting performance

See also[]

References[]

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