List of Link light rail stations

A map of stations on Central Link, which runs between Angle Lake and the University of Washington in Seattle.

Link is a light rail system serving the Seattle metropolitan area and operated by Sound Transit. The network consists of 22 stations on two unconnected lines: fifteen on Central Link and six on Tacoma Link. Link stations are located within four cities in King and Pierce counties: eleven in Seattle, five in Tacoma, two in SeaTac and one in Tukwila.[1][2][3] The two lines had a combined average weekday ridership of 38,918 in 2015, placing it sixteenth among the busiest light rail systems in the United States.[4][5] The busiest station by daily ridership is Westlake station in Seattle, while the least busy is Convention Center/South 15th Street station in Tacoma.[6][7]

The first Link segment began service on August 23, 2003, with the opening of five stations on the 1.6-mile-long (2.6 km) Tacoma Link.[8] The initial, 14-mile-long (23 km) segment of Central Link with 12 stations was opened from Seattle to Tukwila on July 18, 2009, and was later extended 1.7 miles (2.7 km) to the Seattle–Tacoma International Airport on December 19, 2009.[9][10] The first infill station of the Link system, Commerce Street/South 11th Street station on Tacoma Link, opened on September 15, 2011.[11] Central Link was extended north 3.15 miles (5.07 km) to the University of Washington on March 19, 2016, and 1.6 miles (2.6 km) south to Angle Lake station on September 24, 2016.[12][13]

As of 2016, Sound Transit is building three extensions of Central Link that will open between 2021 and 2023 with 13 stations:[14] the 4.3-mile-long (6.9 km) Northgate Link Extension to Seattle's Northgate in 2021;[15] and the 14-mile-long (23 km) East Link Extension to Bellevue and Redmond on the Eastside in 2023.[16][17] Additionally, three extensions approved in the 2008 Sound Transit 2 ballot measure have yet to begin construction, but have funding, and are scheduled to open by 2024:[18] the 8.5-mile-long (13.7 km) Lynnwood Link Extension to Lynnwood in Snohomish County;[19] the 7.6-mile-long (12.2 km) Federal Way Link Extension to Federal Way;[20] and a 2.4-mile-long (3.9 km) extension of Tacoma Link to the Hilltop neighborhood to open in 2022.[21][22] These extensions would add an additional 30 miles (48 km) to the light rail network, carrying an estimated 280,000 daily riders by 2030.[17][23]

Further expansions approved by Sound Transit 3 in 2016 are planned to expand the light rail network by 58 miles (93 km) and 39 stations to a total of 108 miles (174 km) of track and 70 to 75 stations by 2041, carrying 500,000 daily passengers.[24][25] The light rail network will include lines to Ballard and West Seattle in Seattle in 2035 and 2030, respectively; Kirkland and Issaquah on the Eastside in 2041; an extension of East Link to Downtown Redmond in 2024; and extensions to Everett and Tacoma in 2036 and 2030, respectively.[2] Three infill stations in Seattle and Tukwila will also be built as part of the Sound Transit 3 program.[2]

All Central Link light rail stations are built with 380-to-400-foot-long (120 to 120 m), 14-inch-high (0.36 m) platforms, arranged in the center or sides of the two tracks, with capacity to handle a four-car train with 95-foot-long (29 m) vehicles;[26][27][28] Tacoma Link stations are built with 90-foot-long (27 m), 8-inch-high (0.20 m) platforms that can accommodate a one-car train measuring 66 feet (20 m) in length.[29] The majority of stations are built at-grade on the surface, with the platform elevated slightly above street level; there are also elevated stations and underground stations that include mezzanines (with the exception of Mount Baker station) with access the platform from the surface as well as ticket vending machines and bicycle facilities.[30][31] Only three current stations, Angle Lake, Tacoma Dome Station and Tukwila International Boulevard, have public park and rides;[32][33][34] planned stations on the suburban extensions of Link will incorporate new or existing park and rides.[23][35]

All stations include works of public art as part of the "STart" program, which requires one percent of station construction funds go to art installations.[36] The stations are named in accordance to facility naming guidelines that include using surrounding neighborhoods and street names, avoiding words used by existing facility names, and being limited to 30 characters in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act.[37] Stations are also required by state law to be identified by simple pictograms,[38][39] known as "Stellar Connections", that are used in station signage, maps and other printed materials as a wayfinding aid; the icons are composed of points that correspond with local landmarks near Link stations, while also forming a picture that represents the station's identity.[40][41]

Stations[]

Key
Terminal stations
Current Link light rail stations
Station Line[1] Location[3] Opened Weekday ridership[n 1]
Angle Lake SeaTac September 24, 2016[13] 3,194
Beacon Hill Beacon Hill, Seattle July 18, 2009[9] 2,675
Capitol Hill Capitol Hill, Seattle March 19, 2016[42] 7,116
Columbia City Columbia City, Seattle July 18, 2009[9] 2,358
Commerce Street/S 11th St Downtown Tacoma September 15, 2011[11] 1,051
Convention Center/S 15th St Downtown Tacoma August 23, 2003[8] 564
International District/Chinatown[n 2] Chinatown-International District, Seattle July 18, 2009[9][n 3] 5,233
Mount Baker Mount Baker, Seattle July 18, 2009[9] 2,237
Othello NewHolly, Seattle July 18, 2009[9] 2,307
Pioneer Square Pioneer Square, Seattle July 18, 2009[9][n 3] 4,015
Rainier Beach Rainier Beach, Seattle July 18, 2009[9] 1,858
SeaTac/Airport SeaTac December 19, 2009[10] 4,777
SODO SoDo, Seattle July 18, 2009[9] 1,959
S 25th St Tacoma August 23, 2003[8] 878
Stadium SoDo, Seattle July 18, 2009[9] 1,135
Tacoma Dome Tacoma August 23, 2003[8] 2,110
Theater District/S 9th St Tacoma August 23, 2003[8] 995
Tukwila International Boulevard Tukwila July 18, 2009[9] 2,603
Union Station/S 19th St Downtown Tacoma August 23, 2003[8] 1,433
University of Washington University District, Seattle March 19, 2016[42] 9,340
University Street Downtown Seattle July 18, 2009[9][n 3] 5,284
Westlake Downtown Seattle July 18, 2009[9][n 3] 10,096

Stations under construction[]

As of 2017, Sound Transit has two light rail projects under construction: the Northgate Link Extension, scheduled to open in 2021 with three new stations; and the East Link Extension, scheduled to open in 2023 with ten new stations.

Key
Terminal stations
Link Light Rail stations under construction
Station Line/Extension Location[3] Began construction Projected completion
Bel-Red/130th Bel-Red, Bellevue 2016[17] 2023[16]
Bellevue Downtown Downtown Bellevue 2016[17] 2023[16]
East Main Bellevue 2016[17] 2023[16]
Judkins Park Central District, Seattle 2016[17] 2023[16]
Mercer Island Mercer Island 2016[17] 2023[16]
Northgate Northgate, Seattle 2012[45] 2021[15]
Overlake Village Overlake, Redmond 2016[17] 2023[16]
Redmond Technology Center Overlake, Redmond 2016[17] 2023[16]
Roosevelt Roosevelt, Seattle 2012[45] 2021[15]
Spring District/120th Spring District, Bellevue 2016[17] 2023[16]
South Bellevue Bellevue 2016[17] 2023[16]
U District University District, Seattle 2012[45] 2021[15]
Wilburton Bellevue 2016[17] 2023[16]

Planned and funded stations[]

The Sound Transit 3 program, approved by voters in 2016, will expand the Link light rail network to over 116 miles (187 km) and 70 stations when completed in 2041. Other sections of the Sound Transit 2 program, approved by voters in 2008, are anticipated to be complete by 2024.

Key
Terminal stations
Link Light Rail stations in planning
Station[n 4] Line/Extension Location[3] Projected completion
6th Avenue[46] (Hilltop Extension) Hilltop, Tacoma 2022[21]
Boeing Access Road Tukwila 2031
Downtown Redmond Redmond 2024[47]
Federal Way Federal Way 2024[20]
Graham Brighton, Seattle 2031
Hilltop District[46] (Hilltop Extension) Hilltop, Tacoma 2022[21]
Kent/Des Moines Midway, Kent 2024[20]
Lynnwood City Center[48] Lynnwood 2024[19]
Mountlake Terrace[48] Mountlake Terrace 2024[19]
NE 130th Street Pinehurst, Seattle 2031
Old City Hall[46] (Hilltop Extension) Hilltop, Tacoma 2022[21]
S 4th[46] (Hilltop Extension) Stadium District, Tacoma 2022[21]
SE Redmond Redmond 2024[47]
Shoreline South/145th[48] Shoreline 2024[19]
Shoreline North/185th[48] North City, Shoreline 2024[19]
South 272nd Street Federal Way 2024[20]
St Joseph[46] (Hilltop Extension) Hilltop, Tacoma 2022[21]
Stadium District[46] (Hilltop Extension) Stadium District, Tacoma 2022[21]
Tacoma General[46] (Hilltop Extension) Hilltop, Tacoma 2022[21]

Deferred and unbuilt stations[]

Deferred and unbuilt Link Light Rail stations
Station[n 5] Line/Extension Location[3] Deferred/Deleted
220th Street SW Mountlake Terrace April 23, 2015[49][50]
First Hill First Hill, Seattle July 28, 2005[51]

Notes[]

  1. ^ Central Link ridership is calculated from the first quarter of 2017, while Tacoma Link ridership is calculated from 2015.[6][7]
  2. ^ International District/Chinatown station was renamed from International District station by the Metropolitan King County Council on October 19, 2004.[43]
  3. ^ a b c d Stations in the Downtown Seattle Transit Tunnel opened on September 15, 1990 to bus service and were rebuilt for light rail from 2005 to 2007.[44] Light rail service to these stations began with the rest of Central Link on July 18, 2009.[9]
  4. ^ Station names are for planning purposes and subject to change.
  5. ^ Stations were not given official names by the Sound Transit Board prior to their deferral.

References[]

  1. ^ a b "ST Brand: Maps". Sound Transit. October 2016. Retrieved December 13, 2016. 
  2. ^ a b c Sound Transit Future Service (PDF) (Map). Sound Transit. March 2017. Retrieved July 1, 2017. 
  3. ^ a b c d e Growing Transit Communities Oversight Committee (October 2013). "Transit Community Profiles". Puget Sound Regional Council. Retrieved April 22, 2015. 
  4. ^ Fourth Quarter 2015 Service Delivery Quarterly Performance Report (PDF) (Report). Sound Transit. February 25, 2016. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  5. ^ Public Transportation Ridership Report: Fourth Quarter 2015 (PDF) (Report). American Public Transportation Association. March 2, 2016. pp. 3–4. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  6. ^ a b "Q1 2017 Service Delivery Quarterly Performance Report" (PDF). Sound Transit. May 25, 2017. Retrieved July 1, 2017. 
  7. ^ a b "Appendix D: Stop Level Ridership Data". 2016 Service Implementation Plan (PDF) (Report). Sound Transit. December 2015. pp. 169–170. Retrieved April 28, 2016. 
  8. ^ Beekman, Daniel (March 19, 2016). "Capitol Hill, UW light-rail stations open to big crowds". The Seattle Times. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  9. ^ a b "Light rail service to Angle Lake starts Sept. 24" (Press release). Sound Transit. August 24, 2016. Retrieved December 13, 2016. 
  10. ^ "Find a Project". Sound Transit. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  11. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l "Sound Transit kicks off East Link light rail construction" (Press release). Sound Transit. April 22, 2016. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  12. ^ "Regional transit history 2008". Sound Transit. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  13. ^ "Tacoma Link Expansion". Sound Transit Projects & Plans. Sound Transit. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  14. ^ a b "Lynnwood Link moves into final design" (Press release). Sound Transit. April 11, 2016. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  15. ^ Lindblom, Mike (March 24, 2016). "$50B Sound Transit proposal: big taxes, big spending, big plan". The Seattle Times. Retrieved April 30, 2016. 
  16. ^ "Board releases proposal for light rail extensions to Everett, Tacoma, Redmond, West Seattle, Ballard and Issaquah, BRT on I-405, SR 522" (Press release). Sound Transit. March 25, 2016. Retrieved May 1, 2016. 
  17. ^ "Four new light rail cars proposed for Sound Transit's Airport Link extension" (Press release). Sound Transit. October 20, 2005. Retrieved August 1, 2016. 
  18. ^ "Chapter 2: Link Initial Segment/Airport Link System Description". Central Link Operations Plan - Westlake to SeaTac/Airport (PDF) (Report). Sound Transit. July 29, 2008. p. 9. Retrieved August 29, 2016 – via Global Telematics. 
  19. ^ "East Link Extension: Light Rail 101" (PDF). Sound Transit. June 2017. Retrieved January 25, 2018. 
  20. ^ Parsons Brinckerhoff (March 2005). "3.3.2 Station Platforms". Tacoma Link Integration with Central Link (PDF) (Report). Sound Transit. p. 5. Retrieved May 23, 2016. 
  21. ^ "Link light rail stations". Sound Transit. Retrieved August 4, 2016. 
  22. ^ "ORCA Ticket Vending Machines" (PDF). ORCA. March 22, 2016. Retrieved August 4, 2016. 
  23. ^ Lindblom, Mike (January 11, 2010). "Seattle to allow all-day parking lots near light-rail stations, after all". The Seattle Times. Retrieved August 4, 2016. 
  24. ^ "Tacoma Link light rail Stations". Sound Transit. Retrieved August 4, 2016. 
  25. ^ Lindblom, Mike (July 27, 2016). "Light rail's Angle Lake Station in SeaTac nears the finish line". The Seattle Times. Retrieved August 4, 2016. 
  26. ^ Chen, Natasha (March 29, 2016). "Parking problems intensify around light rail stations as more riders hop on". KIRO 7 News. Retrieved August 4, 2016. 
  27. ^ "STart Public Art Program". Sound Transit. Archived from the original on June 12, 2010. Retrieved August 28, 2014. 
  28. ^ "Resolution No. R2012-02: Facility and Link System Naming Policy – Staff Report" (PDF). Sound Transit. February 23, 2012. p. 2. Retrieved November 10, 2014. 
  29. ^ Cohen, Aubrey (March 31, 2014). "Help design pictograms for new Sound Transit stations". Seattle Post-Intelligencer. Retrieved December 1, 2015. 
  30. ^ "RCW 81.112.190: Requirements for signage". Revised Code of Washington. Washington State Legislature. Retrieved December 1, 2015. 
  31. ^ "Stellar Connections". Sound Transit. Archived from the original on June 12, 2010. Retrieved April 3, 2015. 
  32. ^ "Stellar Connections: The story of the pictograms at Link light rail stations" (PDF). Sound Transit. Archived from the original (PDF) on April 8, 2015. Retrieved April 3, 2015. 
  33. ^ a b "University Link light rail extension opens March 19" (Press release). Sound Transit. January 26, 2016. Retrieved January 26, 2016. 
  34. ^ "King County Ordinance 15074: Renaming of the International District station" (PDF). Metropolitan King County Council. October 19, 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on October 2, 2015. Retrieved December 1, 2015. 
  35. ^ Crowley, Walt (October 1, 2000). "Bus service begins in downtown Seattle transit tunnel on September 15, 1990". HistoryLink. Retrieved April 22, 2015. 
  36. ^ a b c d "Sound Transit Motion No. M2017-102" (PDF). Sound Transit. July 27, 2017. Retrieved July 31, 2017. 
  37. ^ "Sound Transit Resolution No. 2015-05" (PDF). Sound Transit. April 23, 2015. Retrieved December 1, 2015. 
  38. ^ "Sound Transit Resolution No. R2005-20" (PDF). Sound Transit. July 28, 2005. Retrieved November 12, 2014. 

External links[]