Larisa Lazutina

Larisa Lazutina
Full nameLarisa Evgenevna Lazutina
Born (1965-06-01) 1 June 1965 (age 53)
Kondopoga, Soviet Union
World Cup career
Seasons1984–2002
Individual wins21
Indiv. podiums65
Overall titles2 – (1990, 1998)
Discipline titles2 – (2 LD)

Larisa Evgenevna Lazutina (Russian: Лариса Евгеньевна Лазутина; born Larisa Ptitsyna (Russian: Лариса Птицына) on 1 June 1965 in Kondopoga, Karelian ASSR) is a former professional cross country skier who competed for Russia during several Winter Olympic Games. In the 1998 Winter Olympics in Nagano, Japan, she won five medals in skiing events: three gold, a silver and a bronze. She was the most successful athlete at the 1998 Winter Olympics. Upon her return from the Olympics, Boris Yeltsin awarded her the title Hero of the Russian Federation.[1] However, Lazutina was banned from competition for a period of two years due to a positive drug test result during the 2002 Winter Olympics in Salt Lake City.

Before the drug test controversy in 2002 ended her career, Lazutina earned several medals at the FIS Nordic World Ski Championships. She won a total of sixteen medals, including eleven golds (5 km: 1993, 1995, 5 km + 10 km combined pursuit: 1995, 15 km: 1995, 30 km: 1999, and 4 x 5 km: 1987, 1993, 1995, 1997, 1999, 2001), three silvers (30 km: 1989, 5 km + 10 km combined pursuit: 1993, 5 km + 5 km combined pursuit: 2001), and two bronzes (20 km: 1987 (as Larissa Ptitsyna) and 10 km: 2001). She was also the first three-time winner of the women's 30 km event at the Holmenkollen ski festival (1995, 1998, and 2001).

Lazutina was awarded the Holmenkollen medal in 1998 (shared with Fred Børre Lundberg, Alexey Prokurorov, and Harri Kirvesniemi).

Accusations of academic dishonesty[]

In 2007 Larisa Lazutina was awarded a Ph.D degree at the Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration. According to an examination by Dissernet, her thesis was heavily plagiarised.[2]

World Cup results[]

All results are sourced from the International Ski Federation (FIS).[3]

Season titles[]

Season
Discipline
1990 Overall
1998 Overall
Long Distance
2000 Long Distance

Individual podiums[]

No. Season Date Location Race Level Place
1  1986–87  20 February 1987 West Germany Oberstdorf, West Germany 20 km Individual F World Championships[1] 3rd
2  1988–89  14 December 1988 Switzerland Campra, Switzerland 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
3 25 February 1989 Finland Lahti, Finland 30 km Individual F World Championships[1] 2nd
4  1989–90  14 December 1988 United States Soldier Hollow, United States 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
5 15 December 1989 Canada Thunder Bay, Canada 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
6 14 January 1990 Soviet Union Moscow, Soviet Union 7.5 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
7 18 February 1990 Switzerland Pontresina, Switzerland 15 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
8 2 March 1990 Finland Lahti, Finland 5 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
9 10 March 1990 Sweden Örnsköldsvik, Sweden 10 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
10 17 March 1990 Norway Vang, Norway 10 km + 10 km Pursuit C/F World Cup 2nd
11  1992–93  12 December 1992 Austria Ramsau, Austria 5 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
12 18 December 1992 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
13 21 February 1993 Sweden Falun, Sweden 5 km Individual C World Championships[1] 1st
14 23 February 1993 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km Pursuit F World Championships[1] 2nd
15 1993–94 19 March 1994 Canada Thunder Bay, Canada 5 km Individual C World Cup 1st
16 20 March 1994 Canada Thunder Bay, Canada 10 km Pursuit F World Cup 2nd
17  1992–93  14 January 1995 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 15 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
18 28 January 1995 Finland Lahti, Finland 10 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
19 4 February 1995 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
20 5 February 1995 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km Pursuit F World Cup 3rd
21 11 February 1995 Norway Oslo, Norway 30 km Individual C World Cup 1st
22 10 March 1995 Canada Thunder Bay, Canada 15 km Individual C World Championships[1] 1st
23 12 March 1995 Canada Thunder Bay, Canada 5 km Individual C World Championships[1] 1st
24 14 March 1995 Canada Thunder Bay, Canada 10 km Pursuit F World Championships[1] 1st
25 25 March 1995 Japan Sapporo, Japan 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
26  1995–96  10 December 1995 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 10 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
27 17 December 1995 Italy Santa Caterina, Italy 10 km Individual C World Cup 1st
28 13 January 1996 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 10 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
29 11 February 1996 Russia Kavgolovo, Russia 10 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
30 24 February 1996 Norway Trondheim, Norway 5 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
31 16 March 1996 Norway Oslo, Norway 30 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
32  1996–97  5 January 1997 Russia Kavgolovo, Russia 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
33 1997–98 22 November 1997 Norway Beitostølen, Norway 5 km Individual C World Cup 1st
34 13 December 1997 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 5 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
35 16 December 1997 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 15 km Individual F World Cup 1st
36 4 January 1998 Russia Kavgolovo, Russia 10 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
37 9 January 1998 Austria Ramsau, Austria 5 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
38 11 January 1998 Austria Ramsau, Austria 10 km Pursuit F World Cup 2nd
39 7 March 1998 Finland Lahti, Finland 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
40 11 March 1998 Sweden Falun, Sweden 5 km Individual F World Cup 1st
41 14 March 1998 Norway Oslo, Norway 30 km Individual C World Cup 1st
42  1998–99  19 December 1998 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 15 km Individual C World Cup 3rd
43 27 February 1999 Austria Ramsau, Austria 30 km Individual C World Championships[1] 1st
44 7 March 1999 Finland Lahti, Finland 10 km Individual C World Cup 1st
45 13 March 1999 Sweden Falun, Sweden 15 km Individual C World Cup 1st
46  1999–00  10 December 1999 Italy Sappada, Italy 10 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
47 12 December 1999 Italy Sappada, Italy 5 km + 7.5 km Skiathlon C/F World Cup 1st
48 18 December 1999 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 15 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
49 12 January 2000 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 10 km Individual C World Cup 1st
50 2 February 2000 Norway Lillehammer, Norway 5 km + 5 km Skiathlon C/F World Cup 1st
51 20 February 2000 France Transjurassienne, France 44 km Mass Start F World Cup 3rd
52 26 February 2000 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
53 5 March 2000 Finland Lahti, Finland 15 km Mass Start C World Cup 1st
54 11 March 2000 Norway Oslo, Norway 30 km Individual C World Cup 2nd
55  2000–01  8 December 2000 Italy Santa Caterina, Italy 10 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
56 16 December 2000 Italy Brusson, Italy 10 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
57 4 March 2001 Russia Kavgolovo, Russia 15 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
58 10 March 2001 Norway Oslo, Norway 30 km Individual C World Cup 1st
59 14 March 2001 Sweden Borlänge, Sweden 5 km Individual F World Cup 3rd
60 17 March 2001 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km Individual F World Cup 2nd
61 18 March 2001 Sweden Falun, Sweden 10 km Individual C World Cup 1st
62 24 March 2001 Finland Kuopio, Finland 40 km Mass Start F World Cup 3rd

Team podiums[]

No. Season Date Location Race Level Place Teammate(s)
1 1986–87 20 February 1987 West Germany Oberstdorf, West Germany 4 x 5 km Relay F World Championships[1] 1st Ordina / Gavrylyuk / Reztsova
2 1 March 1987 Finland Lahti, Finland 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Ordina / Välbe / Reztsova
3  1988–89  12 March 1989 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 2nd Smetanina / Tikhonova / Välbe
4  1989–90  4 March 1990 Finland Lahti, Finland 4 x 5 km Relay F World Cup 2nd Nageykina / Smetanina / Yegorova
5 11 March 1990 Sweden Örnsköldsvik, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Yegorova / Tikhonova / Välbe
6 1991–92 18 February 1992 France Albertville, France 4 x 5 km Relay M Olympic Games[1] 1st Välbe / Smetanina / Yegorova
7 8 March 1992 Sweden Funäsdalen, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 2nd Välbe / Nageykina / Yegorova
8 1992–93 26 February 1993 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay M World Championships[1] 1st Välbe / Gavrylyuk / Yegorova
9 1993–94 22 February 1994 Norway Lillehammer, Norway 4 x 5 km Relay M Olympic Games[1] 1st Välbe / Gavrylyuk / Yegorova
10 4 March 1994 Finland Lahti, Finland 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 2nd Nageykina / Gavrylyuk / Välbe
11 13 March 1994 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay F World Cup 1st Nageykina / Gavrylyuk / Välbe
12 1994–95 15 January 1995 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 1st Danilova / Gavrylyuk / Välbe
13 29 January 1995 Finland Lahti, Finland 4 x 5 km Relay F World Cup 1st Zavyalova / Gavrylyuk / Välbe
14 7 February 1995 Norway Hamar, Norway 4 x 3 km Relay F World Cup 1st Danilova / Gavrylyuk / Välbe
15 12 February 1995 Norway Oslo, Norway 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Danilova / Gavrylyuk / Välbe
16 17 March 1995 Canada Thunder Bay, Canada 4 x 5 km Relay M World Championships[1] 1st Danilova / Välbe / Gavrylyuk
17 26 March 1995 Japan Sapporo, Japan 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Gavrylyuk / Martinova / Välbe
18 1995–96 17 December 1995 Italy Santa Caterina, Italy 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 1st Gavrylyuk / Yegorova / Välbe
19 14 January 1996 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 1st Nageykina / Gavrylyuk / Välbe
20 10 March 1996 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Gavrylyuk / Yegorova / Välbe
21 17 March 1996 Norway Oslo, Norway 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Nageykina / Zavyalova / Gavrylyuk
22 1996–97 24 November 1996 Sweden Kiruna, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 1st Gavrylyuk / Yegorova / Välbe
23 8 December 1996 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 2nd Gavrylyuk / Yegorova / Välbe
24 15 December 1996 Italy Brusson, Italy 4 x 5 km Relay F World Cup 2nd Zavyalova / Nageykina / Chepalova
25 28 February 1997 Norway Trondheim, Norway 4 x 5 km Relay M World Championships[1] 1st Danilova / Gavrylyuk / Välbe
26 9 March 1997 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Danilova / Gavrylyuk / Välbe
27 1997–98 23 November 1997 Norway Beitostølen, Norway 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 1st Baranova-Masalkina / Danilova / Gavrylyuk
28 7 December 1997 Italy Santa Caterina, Italy 4 x 5 km Relay F World Cup 1st Välbe / Chepalova / Danilova
29 14 December 1997 Italy Val di Fiemme, Italy 4 x 5 km Relay F World Cup 1st Nageykina / Välbe / Danilova
30 6 March 1998 Finland Lahti, Finland 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Danilova / Gavrylyuk / Chepalova
31 1998–99 29 November 1998 Finland Muonio, Finland 4 x 5 km Relay F World Cup 1st Danilova / Reztsova / Gavrylyuk
32 20 December 1998 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Danilova / Nageykina / Gavrylyuk
33 26 February 1999 Austria Ramsau, Austria 4 x 5 km Relay M World Championships[1] 1st Danilova / Reztsova / Gavrylyuk
34 14 March 1999 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Nageykina / Baranova-Masalkina / Chepalova
35 21 March 1999 Norway Oslo, Norway 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 1st Nageykina / Gavrylyuk / Chepalova
36  1999–00  28 November 1999 Sweden Kiruna, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay F World Cup 2nd Nageykina / Danilova / Gavrylyuk
37 19 December 1999 Switzerland Davos, Switzerland 4 x 5 km Relay C World Cup 1st Nageykina / Gavrylyuk / Danilova
38 13 January 2000 Czech Republic Nové Město, Czech Republic 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 1st Danilova / Nageykina / Yegorova
39 27 February 2000 Sweden Falun, Sweden 4 x 5 km Relay F World Cup 1st Danilova / Zavyalova / Chepalova
40  2000–01  26 November 2000 Norway Beitostølen, Norway 4 x 5 km Relay M World Cup 2nd Danilova / Yegorova / Chepalova
41 9 December 2000 Italy Santa Caterina, Italy 4 x 3 km Relay M World Cup 1st Gavrylyuk / Zavyalova / Chepalova

Note: 1 Until the 1999 World Championships and the 1994 Olympics, World Championship and Olympic races were included in the World Cup scoring system.

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ http://www.vor.ru/Olymp/history_eng.html#21 Archived 2005-08-31 at the Wayback Machine.
  2. ^ http://wiki.dissernet.org/w/LazutinaLE2007.html
  3. ^ "Athlete : LAZUTINA PTITSYNA Larissa". FIS-Ski. International Ski Federation. Retrieved 25 March 2018.

External links[]