Ehsan Yarshater

Ehsan Yarshater
احسان یارشاطر
Yar young.gif
Portrait photograph, January 1950
Born
Ehsanollah Yarshater[1]

(1920-04-03)April 3, 1920
DiedSeptember 2, 2018(2018-09-02) (aged 98)
NationalityIranian
Alma materUniversity of Tehran
School of Oriental and African Studies
University of London
Occupation
  • Historian
  • linguist
Years active1953–2018
Known forDirector of the Center for Iranian Studies at Columbia University
Notable work
Encyclopædia Iranica
Spouse(s)Latifeh Alvieh (died 1999)
Parent(s)Hashem Yarshater (father)
Rohaniyeh Misaghie (mother)
AwardsBita Award (2015)
Ehsan Yarshater (2011)

Ehsan Yarshater (Persian: احسان يارشاطر, April 3, 1920 – September 1, 2018)[2] was an Iranian historian and linguist who specialized in Iranology. He was the founder and director of The Center for Iranian Studies, and Hagop Kevorkian Professor Emeritus of Iranian Studies at Columbia University.

He was the first Persian full-time professor at a U.S. university since World War II.[3]

He was one of the 40 ors of the Encyclopædia Iranica,[4] with articles by 300 authors from various academic institutions. He also ed the third volume of the Cambridge History of Iran, comprising the history of the Seleucid, the Parthians, and the Sassanians, and a volume entitled Persian Literature. He was also an or of a sixteen-volume series named History of Persian Literature.[5] He had won several International awards for scholarship, including a UNESCO award in 1959, and the Giorgio Levi Della Vida Medal for Achievement in Islamic Studies from UCLA in 1991.[6] Lecture series in his name have been instituted at the University of London, and the University of California, Los Angeles, and at the Centre National de Recherche Scientifique in Paris.

Life and career[]

Born in Hamedan, Iran, Ehsan Yarshater studied Persian language and literature at the University of Tehran and Iranian philology (Old and Middle Iranian) at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London with Walter Bruno Henning. His Tehran University dissertation dealt with Persian poetry under the Timurid Shahrukh (15th century).[7] His University of London dissertation, elaborated and published later as A Grammar of Southern Tati Dialects (Mouton, 1969), describes a series of Tati dialects spoken in the southwest of Qazvin.

He had published a number of articles on modern western Iranian dialects, notably Tati and Taleshi, and the Jewish dialects of Persian (including Lotara'i), and on Persian mythology.

His parents were Iranian Jews who had converted to the Baháʼí Faith, but he had no affiliation with the Baháʼí Faith as an adult.[8][9]

Bibliography[]

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ "Vol. 30, No. 2, Page 5, Summer 2015 Archives". IranNameh. 2016-02-12. Retrieved 2016-05-10.
  2. ^ Alavi, Hamid (September 2, 2018). "درگذشت احسان یارشاطر؛ مردی که زبان فارسی وطنش بود" (in Persian). BBC Persian. Retrieved September 2, 2018.
  3. ^ Cohen, Patricia (2011-08-13). "A Lifetime Quest to Finish a Monumental Encyclopedia of Iran". The New York Times. Retrieved 2011-08-15.
  4. ^ U.S.-funded encyclopedia revels in Iran's greatness. Associated Press, March 26, 2007.
  5. ^ "A History of Persian Literature". Center for Iranian Studies, Columbia University, New York.
  6. ^ "Ehsan Yarshater". Center for Iranian Studies, Columbia University, New York.
  7. ^ http://www.iranicaonline.org/app/webroot/uploads/files/EY95/by-Karimi-Hakkak.pdf[bare URL PDF]
  8. ^ Ashraf, Ahmad (2007-04-05). "Official response of the Encyclopaedia Iranica to the Associated Press article of March 25, 2007 entitled "U.S.-funded encyclopedia revels in Iran's greatness"" (PDF). Encyclopedia Iranica. Archived (PDF) from the original on 2012-12-02.
  9. ^ "Ehsan Yarshater: Historian who transformed the west's understanding of Iran's history and languages".

External links[]