Compilation album

A compilation album comprises tracks, which may be previously released or unreleased, usually from several separate recordings by either one or several performers. If by one artist, then generally the tracks were not originally intended for release together as a single work,[1] but may be collected together as a greatest hits album or box set.[2] If from several performers, there may be a theme, topic, time period, or genre which links the tracks,[3][4] or they may have been intended for release as a single work—such as a tribute album.[5] When the tracks are by the same recording artist, the album may be referred to as a retrospective album or an anthology.[6]

Content and scope[]

Songs included on a compilation album may be previously released or unreleased, usually from several separate recordings by either one or several performers. If by one artist, then generally the tracks were not originally intended for release together as a single work, but may be collected together as a greatest hits album or box set. Compilation albums may employ traditional product bundling strategies.[citation needed]

According to sound technician Richard King, classical music compilations "may require more processing to match tracks coming from various sources and recording venues as well as the different sizes of ensembles."[7]

In Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies (1981), Robert Christgau said, "While compilation albums by album artists (as opposed to stylistically unified singles specialists) are often useless, sometimes they present themselves as events", citing as examples the 1971 Ray Charles LP A 25th Anniversary in Show Business Salute to Ray Charles, The Kink Kronikles (1972), and Changesonebowie (1976).[8]

Common types[]

Common types of compilation include:

Royalties[]

For multi-artist compilations, royalties are usually pro-rated. In most cases, each artist's per-record royalty rate (typically 12–14% in 1999)[12] is divided by the number of artists on the album. However, some record companies opt to simplify the equation and pay a rounded-off rate, either as a percentage or as a set amount, regardless of the total number of artists on the record. As of 1999, these rates were around 1/2% to 1% or 15–16 cents per record.[12] When a compilation album includes a track from a different record company, the royalties are split between the artist and the original record company.[12] Unless specifically limited by a contract, record companies may release as many greatest hits albums by their recording artist as they wish without requiring the artist's agreement or permission.[13]

Charts[]

In the United Kingdom, The Official Charts Company compiles a weekly compilation albums chart, limited to various artists compilations and soundtrack compilations.[14]

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ McDonald, Heather (30 April 2018). "A Definition of, and Look at, Compilation Albums". The Balance Careers. Archived from the original on 20 August 2018. Retrieved 6 September 2018.
  2. ^ Marc Burrows (20 November 2013). "Why a greatest hits album can be the band's greatest". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2 October 2018. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  3. ^ "Definition of 'compilation album'". collinsdictionary.com. Archived from the original on 2 October 2018. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  4. ^ Emily Jupp (25 September 2015). "32 years of NOW music compilations". independent.co.uk. Archived from the original on 2 October 2018. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  5. ^ Michael Hann (9 April 2018). "Covered in glory: the tribute albums that saved careers and changed lives". The Guardian. Archived from the original on 2 October 2018. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  6. ^ "Definition of retrospective in English". oxforddictionaries.com. Archived from the original on 2 October 2018. Retrieved 1 October 2018.
  7. ^ King, Richard (2016). Recording Orchestra and Other Classical Music Ensembles. Taylor & Francis. p. 223. ISBN 978-1317520818.
  8. ^ Christgau, Robert (1981). "The Criteria". Christgau's Record Guide: Rock Albums of the Seventies. Ticknor & Fields. ISBN 0899190251. Archived from the original on 6 April 2019. Retrieved 6 April 2019 – via robertchristgau.com.
  9. ^ "TLC to Release Greatest Hits Compilation to Accompany Biopic, New Album Coming in 2014". Pitchfork. 23 September 2013. Archived from the original on 4 December 2013. Retrieved 1 December 2013.
  10. ^ Gentile, John (8 November 2013). "Deadmau5 Compilation 'We Are Friends Vol. 2' – Album Premiere". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 11 November 2013. Retrieved 1 December 2013.
  11. ^ Suchet, Richard (28 November 2013). "Now Compilation Albums Celebrate 30 Years". Sky News. Archived from the original on 1 December 2013. Retrieved 1 December 2013.
  12. ^ a b c Brian McPherson (1999). Get It in Writing: The Musician's Guide to the Music Business. Hal Leonard Corp. p. 68. ISBN 9780793566990. Archived from the original on 29 July 2020. Retrieved 24 March 2015.
  13. ^ Brian McPherson (1999). Get It in Writing: The Musician's Guide to the Music Business. Hal Leonard Corp. p. 89. ISBN 9780793566990.
  14. ^ "UK Top 40 Compilation Albums Archived 14 July 2018 at the Wayback Machine", BBC, retrieved 1 April 2012