Coenzyme M

Coenzyme M
Coenzyme M (CoM).svg
Names
IUPAC name
2-Sulfanylethanesulfonate
Systematic IUPAC name
2-Sulfanylethanesulfonate
Other names
2-mercaptoethylsulfonate; 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate; coenzyme M anion; H-S-CoM; AC1L1HCY; 2-sulfanylethane-1-sulfonate; CTK8A8912
Identifiers
  • 3375-50-6 (sulfonic acid form) checkY
  • 40292-31-7 (sulfonate form)
3D model (JSmol)
ChEBI
ChemSpider
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C2H6O3S2/c3-7(4,5)2-1-6/h6H,1-2H2,(H,3,4,5)/p-1 checkY
    Key: ZNEWHQLOPFWXOF-UHFFFAOYSA-M checkY
  • [O-]S(=O)(=O)CCS
Properties
C2H5O3S2
Molar mass 141.18 g·mol−1
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
Infobox references

Coenzyme M is a coenzyme required for methyl-transfer reactions in the metabolism of archaeal methanogens,[1][2] and in the metabolism of other substrates in bacteria.[3] The coenzyme is an anion with the formula HSCH
2
CH
2
SO
3
. It is named 2-mercaptoethanesulfonate and abbreviated HS–CoM. The cation is unimportant, but the sodium salt is most available. Mercaptoethanesulfonate contains both a thiol, which is the main site of reactivity, and a sulfonate group, which confers solubility in aqueous media.

Biochemical role[]

The coenzyme is the C1 donor in methanogenesis. It is converted to methyl-coenzyme M thioether, the thioether CH
3
SCH
2
CH
2
SO
3
, in the penultimate step to methane formation.[4] Methyl-coenzyme M reacts with coenzyme B, 7-thioheptanoylthreoninephosphate, to give a heterodisulfide, releasing methane:

CH
3
–S–CoM
+ HS–CoB → CH
4
+ CoB–S–S–CoM

This induction is catalyzed by the enzyme methyl-coenzyme M reductase, which restricts cofactor F430 as the prosthetic group.

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ Balch WE, Wolfe RS (1979). "Specificity and biological distribution of coenzyme M (2-mercaptoethanesulfonic acid)". J. Bacteriol. 137 (1): 256–63. doi:10.1128/JB.137.1.256-263.1979. PMC 218444. PMID 104960.
  2. ^ Taylor CD, Wolfe RS (10 August 1974). "Structure and methylation of coenzyme M(HSCH
    2
    CH
    2
    SO
    3
    )"
    . J. Biol. Chem. 249 (15): 4879–85. PMID 4367810. Archived from the original on 25 May 2009. Retrieved 29 November 2007.
  3. ^ Partovi, Sarah E.; Mus, Florence; Gutknecht, Andrew E.; Martinez, Hunter A.; Tripet, Brian P.; Lange, Bernd Markus; DuBois, Jennifer L.; Peters, John W. (2018-04-06). "Coenzyme M biosynthesis in bacteria involves phosphate elimination by a functionally distinct member of the aspartase/fumarase superfamily". The Journal of Biological Chemistry. 293 (14): 5236–5246. doi:10.1074/jbc.RA117.001234. ISSN 1083-351X. PMC 5892593. PMID 29414784.
  4. ^ Thauer RK (1998). "Biochemistry of Methanogenesis: a Tribute to Marjory Stephenson". Microbiology. 144 (9): 2377–2406. doi:10.1099/00221287-144-9-2377. PMID 9782487.