Charles Leclerc

Charles Leclerc
Charles Leclerc after winning F2 championship-2.jpg
Leclerc in 2017
Born (1997-10-16) 16 October 1997 (age 21)
Monte Carlo, Monaco
Formula One World Championship career
NationalityMonaco Monégasque
2018 teamSauber-Ferrari[1]
2019 teamFerrari[2]
Car number16
Entries21 (21 starts)
Championships0
Wins0
Podiums0
Career points39
Pole positions0
Fastest laps0
First entry2018 Australian Grand Prix
Last entry2018 Abu Dhabi Grand Prix
2018 position13th (39 pts)
FIA Formula 2 Championship career
Debut season2017
Current teamPrema Racing
Car no.1
Starts22
Wins7
Podiums9
Poles8
Fastest laps4
Best finish1st in 2017
Previous series
2017
2016
2015
2014
2014
FIA Formula 2 Championship
GP3 Series
European Formula 3
Formula Renault 2.0 Alps
Eurocup Formula Renault 2.0
Championship titles
2017
2016
FIA Formula 2 Championship
GP3 Series
Awards
2017–18Autosport Rookie of the Year

Charles Leclerc (French pronunciation: ​[ʃaʁl ləklɛʁ]; born 16 October 1997) is a Monégasque racing driver, currently driving in Formula One for Scuderia Ferrari. Leclerc won the GP3 Series championship in 2016 and the FIA Formula 2 Championship in 2017.[3][4] He made his Formula One debut in 2018 for Sauber, a team affiliated with Ferrari, for which he was part of its driver academy. With Sauber having finished last the year before, Leclerc led the charge to improve the finishing position in the constructors' championship to eighth, being the highest ranked of the two Sauber drivers.[5]

Leclerc has agreed on a contract with Ferrari for the 2019 season where he will drive alongside Sebastian Vettel.[6]

Personal life[]

During his childhood, the Monaco-born Leclerc was a friend of the late Jules Bianchi from nearby Nice, who won his first racing championship when Leclerc was 10 years old. Leclerc began karting at the track managed by Bianchi's father in Brignoles. Like Bianchi, Leclerc joined the ARM management company headed by Nicolas Todt.[7] In an interview in 2018, Leclerc revealed that Bianchi was also his godfather.[8]

Leclerc has two brothers, Lorenzo and Arthur. His father, Hervé, also raced cars, driving in Formula 3 in the 1980s and 1990s, and was well respected in karting. He died after a long illness, aged 54, just four days before his son won the feature race at the 2017 Formula 2 Baku weekend.[9][10]

Career[]

Karting[]

Leclerc began his karting career in 2005, winning the French PACA Championship in 2005, 2006 and 2008.[11] In 2009 he became French Cadet champion before moving up to the KF3 class in 2010, where he won the Junior Monaco Kart Cup.[12] He continued in the KF3 class for 2011, winning the CIK-FIA KF3 World Cup, the CIK-FIA Karting Academy Trophy and the ERDF Junior Kart Masters.[13] During the year, Leclerc also became a member of Nicolas Todt's All Road Management company.[14]

Leclerc graduated to the KF2 category in 2012 with the factory-backed ART Grand Prix team, winning the WSK Euro Series title,[15] as well as finishing runner-up in the CIK-FIA European KF2 Championship and the CIK-FIA Under 18 World Karting Championship.[16]

In his final year of karting in 2013, Leclerc claimed sixth position in the CIK-FIA European KZ Championship and finished second in the CIK-FIA World KZ Championship, behind current Red Bull Formula One driver Max Verstappen.[17]

Formula Renault 2.0[]

In 2014, Leclerc graduated to single-seaters, racing in the Formula Renault 2.0 Alps championship for British team Fortec Motorsports.[18] During the season, he took seven podium positions, including a double victory at Monza,[19] to finish runner-up in the championship behind Koiranen GP's Nyck de Vries.[20] Leclerc also won the Junior Championship title at the final race of the season in Jerez, finishing ahead of Russian teenager Matevos Isaakyan.[21]

Leclerc also took part in a partial Eurocup Formula Renault 2.0 season with Fortec as a guest driver. In the six races he contested he finished on the podium three times, taking a second place at the Nürburgring followed by a pair of second-place finishes at the Hungaroring.[22]

Formula Three[]

Leclerc graduated to Formula Three in 2015, racing in the FIA Formula 3 European Championship with Dutch team Van Amersfoort Racing.[23] At the opening round of the season in Silverstone, Leclerc inherited Pole position for the second and third races of the weekend after original pole-sitter Felix Rosenqvist was excluded for a technical infringement.[24] He went on to take his first race victory in the third race of the weekend, ahead of Antonio Giovinazzi and Jake Dennis.[25] He took his second victory at the following round in Hockenheim, winning the third race as well as taking two additional podiums and three rookie victories over the course of the event.[26] Leclerc scored his third win in the first race at Spa-Francorchamps which saw him take the lead in the championship. However, Leclerc finished fourth in the standings, mostly due to damage sustained to his car's chassis following a collision with Lance Stroll at Zandvoort.

In November 2015, Leclerc finished second at the Macau Grand Prix.

GP3 Series[]

In December 2015, Leclerc partook in post-season testing with ART Grand Prix and Arden International. In February 2016, de Vries confirmed that Leclerc would race in the 2016 season.[27] ART signed Leclerc the following week. With the team, he claimed three victories and took the title in Abu Dhabi, despite crashing out in the feature race.

FIA Formula 2 Championship[]

Charles Leclerc crossing the start/finish line at Jerez in 2017
Leclerc leading the Jerez feature race, on his way to winning the Formula 2 championship

The week following his victory in the GP3 title race, Leclerc was confirmed to be graduating to the series for the 2017 season with Prema Racing, alongside fellow GP3 racer and Ferrari junior Antonio Fuoco.[28]

He made his debut at Bahrain, where he took pole position for the feature race, but only finished third.[29] In the sprint race, his Prema team chose to take a mid-race pit stop, which is very uncommon in the shorter sprint races. He pushed harder on his medium Pirelli tyres, creating a 9-second lead, before pitting. This would drop him down to 14th place, but Leclerc overtook 13 cars and took victory by overtaking Luca Ghiotto on the final lap.[30] After taking pole position for the second time in a row, he then fought off Ghiotto to win again in the Catalunya feature race, despite a radio issue.[31][32]

Leclerc did not score any points at his home round at the Monaco. He was on pole, but retired from the lead of the race with a suspension problem. The retirement also meant he would start the sprint race from the back of the grid, and in this race he collided with Norman Nato whilst trying to make his way up the grid, which ultimately resulted in both drivers retiring from the race. He retained the championship lead despite the bad weekend, which he described as 'hugely disappointing'.[33][34][35]

Leclerc took a fourth consecutive pole at a race Azerbaijan, which he dedicated to his late father, Herve.[10] He converted this into another win, although the race was red flagged five laps before the scheduled end.[36] In the sprint race, he started from eighth, and dropped to tenth early on, but fought back to sixth. The retirement of the race leader, his title rival Oliver Rowland, and De Vries, who was also ahead of Leclerc, meant Leclerc improved to fourth. He then passed Nicholas Latifi and Jordan King, and began to close on the new leader, Nato. He passed Nato, but had been given a 10-second penalty for failing to slow for yellow flags, and therefore finished second.[37]

In Austria he took his fifth pole position, and then won the feature race from pole despite coming under pressure from teammate Fuoco, and towards the end, the DAMS of Latifi.[38][39] He would retire from the sprint race after colliding with Fuoco and spinning out.[40] By taking pole for the sixth time for the next race, at Silverstone, he matched the record for most pole positions in a row, which was set by Stoffel Vandoorne in 2014 and 2015, when the series were called GP2 Series. He won the feature race, even after his car set alight during the race, and even after one of his wing mirrors detached in the closing stages.[41]

He would not start from pole in Hungary, despite taking his seventh successive pole position, as he was disqualified for a technical infringement. Despite starting from the back, he was in 12th position by turn 1. Using an alternative tyre strategy that saw him start on the medium tyres, Leclerc was stuck behind Alexander Albon, who was on the same strategy, although he eventually got past and would finish fourth. He would also finish fourth in the sprint race the next day, giving him a 50-point championship lead over Rowland.[42][43][44]

For the Belgian rounds, Leclerc again took pole and won the race by a convincing margin of over 20 seconds, however his win was disqualified as one of his skidblocks was excessively worn. Having to start in 19th place, Leclerc managed to go back up to 5th place and finish 3.8 seconds behind the race winner, Sérgio Sette Câmara.

Leclerc at the 2017 Formula 2 race at the Autodromo Nazionale Monza in Italy

For the Italian feature race, Leclerc was battling for the lead however on the final lap, he was involved in an accident with De Vries. After starting towards the back of the grid for the second consecutive sprint race, Leclerc managed to fight his way back to 9th position, albeit out of the points.

With a 57-point margin over Rowland heading into the penultimate rounds at Jerez, Leclerc gained his 8th pole position of the season, with both of his timed laps being good enough for pole position. In the feature race, Leclerc dominated most of the early stint on soft tyres and was able to overtake most of the runners on the alternate strategy. With 7 laps to go however, Nobuharu Matsushita collided with Santino Ferrucci, which brought out the safety car. At the point that the race resumed, Leclerc was misinformed over team radio that it was the "last lap" even though there were four laps to go,[45] so after pushing hard to build a gap Leclerc's tyres were "overheated badly"[45] with several laps still to run, yet despite his tyres being "completely gone" by the end Leclerc managed to hold off a charging Rowland by 0.23 seconds,[46] and claim the FIA Formula 2 championship in his rookie season in the main F1 feeder series.

In claiming the championship, Leclerc became the youngest ever champion of the main support series for Formula 1 at 19 years 356 days old, and the first driver since Nico Hülkenberg in 2009 to win the championship in their rookie season (a feat which only Nico Rosberg and Lewis Hamilton have previously accomplished) and is the only driver to claim a championship with the Dallara GP2/11 chassis in their rookie season.

For the sprint race, Leclerc started in 8th place, however due to his car's aggressive setup, he and his teammate, Antonio Fuoco, had to pit in the sprint race. Due to the aggressive pace of Leclerc however, he rose up through the field, yet because of the excessive wear on his tyres, he conceded 3 positions on the final lap and finished in 7th position.

For the final rounds at Abu Dhabi, Leclerc qualified in 6th place for the Feature race, his lowest starting position all season barring penalties. Despite this however, he managed to finish the highest of the alternate strategy runners in Abu Dhabi (Soft then Super Soft) in 4th place (he had made it up till 3rd until the final corner of the final lap where he was pipped by Antonio Fuoco). This position however was subsequently changed to second after the race winner, Oliver Rowland, and Fuoco were disqualified for excessive floor wear and under-inflated front tyres respectively.

For Leclerc's final race, he started in 7th position. He was initially able to make up 2 places but was running slower than the race leaders Alexander Albon and Nicholas Latifi. As the race progressed however, Leclerc started gaining time compared to his rivals and managed to take Latifi with a few laps to go. For the final three laps, DRS was disabled and yellow flags in the final sector meant that Leclerc was stuck behind Albon, however on the final lap, both drivers tangled, triggered by Leclerc nudging Albon, and both had a drag race which they constantly were pushing each other until Leclerc finally took the lead and won by 1.293 seconds his final victory in his last ever F2 race.

Formula One[]

Leclerc's first drive in a Formula One race weekend, with Haas at the 2016 British Grand Prix
Leclerc testing for Sauber at the 2017 Malaysian Grand Prix

In March 2016, it was announced that Leclerc would be one of two drivers to join the Ferrari Driver Academy and would act as development driver for Haas F1 Team and Scuderia Ferrari.[47] As part of his role as development driver, Leclerc participated in the first practice session of the 2016 British Grand Prix driving for Haas. It was believed that if Leclerc won the GP3 Series championship, he would follow Daniil Kvyat and Valtteri Bottas direct from GP3 into F1 with Haas.[48] However this was debunked by Haas team principal Guenther Steiner who said that Leclerc would progress to the 2017 FIA Formula 2 Championship.[49] He took part in the mid-season Hungaroring test following the Hungarian Grand Prix, driving the Ferrari SF70H. He was fastest on the first day of the test, running 98 laps in the process, but did not take part in the second day's test.[50]

Sauber (2018)[]

Leclerc racing for Sauber at the 2018 Chinese Grand Prix

In December 2017, it was announced that Leclerc would make his racing debut in Formula One, signing with the newly rebranded Alfa Romeo Sauber F1 Team as regular driver for 2018,[1] thus marking the first appearance of a Monégasque Formula One driver since Olivier Beretta in 1994.[N 1]

At the 2018 Azerbaijan Grand Prix, a sixth place finish saw him become only the second Monégasque to score points in Formula One, after Louis Chiron finished on the podium at the 1950 Monaco Grand Prix.

Ferrari (2019)[]

On 11 September 2018, Leclerc was announced by Scuderia Ferrari for the 2019 season, replacing Kimi Räikkönen, who will move to Sauber.[52][53] While initially only announced for 2019, a few days later, Ferrari team principal Maurizio Arrivabene indicated that Leclerc's contract was going to be four seasons long, running "at least until 2022".[54] Leclerc made his first test day as an official Ferrari race driver on 28 November 2018 in Abu Dhabi.[55]

Racing record[]

Career summary[]

Season Series Team Races Wins Poles F/Laps Podiums Points Position
2014 Formula Renault 2.0 Alps Fortec Motorsports 14 2 1 0 7 199 2nd
Eurocup Formula Renault 2.0 6 0 0 0 3 0 NC†
2015 FIA Formula 3 European Championship Van Amersfoort Racing 33 4 3 5 13 363.5 4th
Macau Grand Prix 1 0 0 0 1 N/A 2nd
2016 Formula One Scuderia Ferrari Test driver
Haas F1 Team
GP3 Series ART Grand Prix 18 3 4 4 8 202 1st
2017 Formula One Scuderia Ferrari Test driver
Sauber F1 Team
FIA Formula 2 Championship Prema Racing 22 7 8 4 10 282 1st
2018 Formula One Alfa Romeo Sauber F1 Team 21 0 0 0 0 39 13th
2019 Formula One Scuderia Ferrari Mission Winnow 0 0 0 0 0 0 N/A

† As Leclerc was a guest driver, he was ineligible for championship points.

Complete FIA Formula 3 European Championship results[]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 DC Points
2015 Van Amersfoort Racing Volkswagen SIL
1

12
SIL
2

2
SIL
3

1
HOC
1

3
HOC
2

2
HOC
3

1
PAU
1

3
PAU
2

2
PAU
3

3
MNZ
1

5
MNZ
2

Ret
MNZ
3

3
SPA
1

1
SPA
2

6
SPA
3

2
NOR
1

1
NOR
2

3
NOR
3

4
ZAN
1

5
ZAN
2

Ret
ZAN
3

10
RBR
1

6
RBR
2

4
RBR
3

6
ALG
1

6
ALG
2

7
ALG
3

7
NÜR
1

4
NÜR
2

5
NÜR
3

5
HOC
1

8
HOC
2

10
HOC
3

21
4th 363.5

Complete GP3 Series results[]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 Pos Points
2016 ART Grand Prix CAT
FEA

1
CAT
SPR

9
RBR
FEA

1
RBR
SPR

Ret
SIL
FEA

2
SIL
SPR

3
HUN
FEA

6
HUN
SPR

3
HOC
FEA

5
HOC
SPR

3
SPA
FEA

1
SPA
SPR

6
MNZ
FEA

4
MNZ
SPR

Ret
SEP
FEA

3
SEP
SPR

5
YMC
FEA

Ret
YMC
SPR

9
1st 202

Complete FIA Formula 2 Championship results[]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position) (Races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 DC Points
2017 Prema Racing BHR
FEA

3
BHR
SPR

1
CAT
FEA

1
CAT
SPR

4
MON
FEA

Ret
MON
SPR

18†
BAK
FEA

1
BAK
SPR

2
RBR
FEA

1
RBR
SPR

Ret
SIL
FEA

1
SIL
SPR

5
HUN
FEA

4
HUN
SPR

4
SPA
FEA

DSQ
SPA
SPR

5
MNZ
FEA

17
MNZ
SPR

9
JER
FEA

1
JER
SPR

7
YMC
FEA

2
YMC
SPR

1
1st 282

Complete Formula One results[]

(key) (Races in bold indicate pole position; races in italics indicate fastest lap)

Year Entrant Chassis Engine 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 WDC Points
2016 Haas F1 Team Haas VF-16 Ferrari 061 1.6 V6 t AUS BHR CHN RUS ESP MON CAN EUR AUT GBR
TD
HUN
TD
GER
TD
BEL ITA SIN MAL JPN USA MEX BRA
TD
ABU
2017 Sauber F1 Team Sauber C36 Ferrari 061 1.6 V6 t AUS CHN BHR RUS ESP MON CAN AZE AUT GBR HUN BEL ITA SIN MAL
TD
JPN USA
TD
MEX
TD
BRA
TD
ABU
2018 Alfa Romeo Sauber F1 Team Sauber C37 Ferrari 062 EVO 1.6 V6 t AUS
13
BHR
12
CHN
19
AZE
6
ESP
10
MON
18
CAN
10
FRA
10
AUT
9
GBR
Ret
GER
15
HUN
Ret
BEL
Ret
ITA
11
SIN
9
RUS
7
JPN
Ret
USA
Ret
MEX
7
BRA
7
ABU
7
13th 39

Did not finish, but was classified as he had completed more than 90% of the race distance.

Notes[]

  1. ^ Beretta is the last Monégasque to compete in the sport, however Dutch driver Robert Doornbos raced with a Monégasque license due to FIA license regulation in 2005.[51]

References[]

  1. ^ a b Cite error: The named reference Alfa Romeo Sauber was invoked but never defined (see the help page).
  2. ^ "Charles Leclerc to drive for Scuderia Ferrari in 2019". Scuderia Ferrari. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  3. ^ Allen, Peter (26 November 2016). "Leclerc is GP3 champion despite collision as De Vries wins". formulascout.com. Retrieved 14 May 2017.
  4. ^ "Leclerc seals F2 title with Jerez win". Autosport.com. Motorsport Network. 7 October 2017. Retrieved 8 October 2017.
  5. ^ "2018 Formula One Etihad Airways Abu Dhabi Grand Prix - Race - Sunday". Alfa Romeo Sauber F1. 25 November 2018. Retrieved 1 December 2018.
  6. ^ "Charles Leclerc to drive for Scuderia Ferrari in 2019". Scuderia Ferrari. 11 September 2018. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  7. ^ "Exclu : Jules Bianchi nous parle de Charles Leclerc ! | Charles Leclerc Fans". Retrieved 27 November 2015.
  8. ^ "Charles Leclerc's Walk to Work – 2018 Monaco Grand Prix". FORMULA 1. Retrieved 25 May 2018.
  9. ^ CIKFIA. "Hervé Leclerc passes away : CIKFIA". www.cikfia.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  10. ^ a b Kalinauckas, Valentin Khorounzhiy and Alex. "Charles Leclerc: Emotional Baku Formula 2 pole was for late father". Autosport.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  11. ^ "Charles Leclerc". allroadmanagement.com. All Road Management. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  12. ^ "Monaco Kart Cup – KF3 2010 standings". driverdb.com. Driver Database. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  13. ^ "Karting details – the karting career of Charles Leclerc". driverdb.com. Driver Database. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  14. ^ "All Road Management – About Us". allroadmanagement.com. All Road Management. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  15. ^ "ART Grand Prix and Charles Leclerc conquered the WSK Euro Series championship in Zuera". karting.art-grandprix.com. ART Grand Prix. 6 August 2012. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  16. ^ "Charles Leclerc". karting.art-grandprix.com. ART Grand Prix. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  17. ^ "CIK-FIA World KZ Championship 2013 standings". driverdb.com. Driver Database. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  18. ^ Goddard, Stephen (26 November 2013). "Leclerc teams up with Fortec for Alps campaign". paddockscout.com. Paddock Scout. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  19. ^ Khorounzhiy, Valentin (6 July 2014). "Charles Leclerc grabs second win of Monza weekend". paddockscout.com. Paddock Scout. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  20. ^ "Formula Renault 2.0 Alps 2014 standings". driverdb.com. Driver Database. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  21. ^ "Leclerc takes Rookie Championship title". fortecmotorsports.com. Fortec Motorsports. 8 October 2014. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  22. ^ Allen, Peter (18 December 2014). "PaddockScout Top 50 drivers of 2014: 20–11". paddockscout.com. Paddock Scout. Retrieved 2 January 2015.
  23. ^ Simmons, Marcus (14 January 2015). "Nicolas Todt protege Charles Leclerc secures F3 deal for 2015". Autosport. Haymarket Publications. Retrieved 14 January 2015.
  24. ^ Allen, Peter (11 April 2015). "Rosenqvist excluded from second qualifying, Leclerc inherits two poles". paddockscout.com. Paddock Scout. Retrieved 12 April 2015.
  25. ^ Allen, Peter (12 April 2015). "Charles Leclerc gets victory in final race of debut F3 weekend". paddockscout.com. Paddock Scout. Retrieved 12 April 2015.
  26. ^ Allen, Peter (3 May 2015). "Charles Leclerc wins wet third European F3 race at Hockenheim". paddockscout.com. Paddock Scout. Retrieved 3 May 2015.
  27. ^ "De Vries joins 2016 GP3 field with ART". 24 February 2016. Retrieved 24 February 2016. We have Charles Leclerc, Alexander Albon [neither confirmed yet], Jake Hughes, Jack Aitken and Kevin Jorg lining up on the grid and Antonio Fuoco is staying for another season. All these guys are capable of winning races
  28. ^ "GP2: Ferrari juniors to Prema for 2017". 28 November 2016. Retrieved 28 November 2016.
  29. ^ Kalinauckas, Alex. "Bahrain Formula 2: Markelov beats Nato and Leclerc with late surge". Autosport.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  30. ^ Kalinauckas, Alex. "Bahrain Formula 2: Ferrari junior Leclerc beats Ghiotto and Rowland". Autosport.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  31. ^ "Leclerc scorches to feature victory – Formula 2". www.fiaformula2.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  32. ^ "Feature Race Press Conference, Barcelona – Formula 2". www.fiaformula2.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  33. ^ Kalinauckas, Alex. "Monaco F2: Rowland takes first win as Leclerc retires". Autosport.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  34. ^ "Monaco F2: De Vries takes maiden win in Rapax 1–2". Motorsport.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  35. ^ "Leclerc column: Moving on from Monaco misfortune". Motorsport.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  36. ^ Kalinauckas, Alex. "Baku F2: Ferrari junior Charles Leclerc wins red-flagged race". Autosport.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  37. ^ "Formula 2 – The Insider – Issue 4: So Close!" (PDF). fiaformula2.com.
  38. ^ "Leclerc Makes it Five in Austria – Formula 2". www.fiaformula2.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  39. ^ "Leclerc soars to feature victory – Formula 2". www.fiaformula2.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  40. ^ Kalinauckas, Alex. "Artem Markelov wins Austria F2 sprint race, Charles Leclerc crashes". Autosport.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  41. ^ "Leclerc flies to five in Silverstone feature – Formula 2". www.fiaformula2.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  42. ^ "Rowland on top in dramatic Budapest feature – Formula 2". www.fiaformula2.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  43. ^ "Matsushita dominates Budapest sprint – Formula 2". www.fiaformula2.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  44. ^ "STATS TO CHAT – The Insider". theinsider.fiaformula2.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  45. ^ a b "Leclerc column: How lap count mishap nearly delayed F2 title". Motorsport.com. Retrieved 6 February 2018.
  46. ^ "Results – Formula 2". www.fiaformula2.com. Retrieved 6 February 2018.
  47. ^ "Leclerc gets Ferrari and Haas development role". 1 March 2016. Retrieved 1 March 2016.
  48. ^ "Charles Leclerc: GP3 title key to 2017 F1 hopes". 23 July 2016. Retrieved 6 September 2016.
  49. ^ "Haas' Steiner: GP3's Leclerc to drive in GP2". readmotorsport.com. 7 November 2016. Retrieved 1 January 2017.
  50. ^ "Leclerc heads day one of Budapest test for Ferrari". Formula1.com. Retrieved 8 August 2017.
  51. ^ "2005 FIA Formula One World Championship Classifications". Fédération Internationale de l'Automobile. Archived from the original on 14 March 2006. Retrieved 10 December 2017.
  52. ^ "Charles Leclerc to drive for Scuderia Ferrari in 2019". Scuderia Ferrari. 11 September 2018. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  53. ^ Mitchell, Scott (11 September 2018). "Ferrari confirms Leclerc for 2019 F1 season". Motorsport.com. Retrieved 11 September 2018.
  54. ^ Cooper, Adam (14 September 2018). "Ferrari signed Leclerc until at least 2022". Motorsport.com. Retrieved 14 September 2018.
  55. ^ Mitchell, Scott (28 November 2018). "Leclerc leads second morning of Abu Dhabi test". Motorsport.com. Retrieved 28 November 2018.

External links[]

Sporting positions
Preceded by
Antonio Fuoco
Formula Renault 2.0 Alps
Junior Champion

2014
Succeeded by
Matevos Isaakyan
Preceded by
Esteban Ocon
FIA Formula 3 European Championship
Rookie Champion

2015
Succeeded by
Joel Eriksson
Preceded by
Esteban Ocon
GP3 Series
Champion

2016
Succeeded by
George Russell
Preceded by
Pierre Gasly
(GP2 Series)
FIA Formula 2 Championship
Champion

2017
Succeeded by
George Russell
Awards
Preceded by
Kevin Hansen
FIA Rookie of the Year
2017–2018
Succeeded by
Incumbent
Preceded by
Pascal Wehrlein
Autosport Awards
Rookie of the Year

2017–2018
Succeeded by
Incumbent