8.8 cm SK L/30 naval gun

8.8 cm SK L/30
SMS S 19.jpg
8.8 cm SK L/30 mounted on the bow of S-19
Type Naval gun
Place of origin German Empire
Service history
In service 1892–1945
Used by  German Empire
 Nazi Germany
Wars World War I
World War II
Production history
Designed 1890—1892
Specifications
Weight 644 kilograms (1,420 lb)
Length about 2.64 meters (8 ft 8 in)

Shell fixed
Shell weight 7 kilograms (15 lb)[1]
Caliber 88 millimeters (3.5 in)
Breech horizontal sliding-wedge
Elevation Depends on mount:
MPL C/89: -10° to +20°
Ubts.L: -10° to +30°[2]
Rate of fire 15 RPM
Muzzle velocity 590 m/s (1,900 ft/s)
Maximum firing range Depends on mount:
MPL C/89: 7,300 metres (8,000 yd) at +20°
Ubts.L: 10,500 metres (11,500 yd) at +30°[3]

The 8.8 cm SK L/30 (SK - Schnelladekanone (quick loading cannon) L - Länge (with a 30-caliber barrel) was a German naval gun that was used in World War I on a variety of mounts.

Description[]

The 8.8 cm SK L/30 gun weighed 644 kilograms (1,420 lb) and had an overall length of about 2.64 meters (8 ft 8 in). It used the Krupp horizontal sliding block, or "wedge", as it is sometimes referred to, breech design. In addition to mounts for surface ships there was also a submarine version which was on either a retractable or fixed pivot mount. The Krupp mount retracted vertically through a hatch, while the Erhardt version folded down onto the ship's deck.[4]

Naval Service[]

The 8.8 cm SK L/30 was a widely used naval gun on World War I Pre-dreadnoughts, Cruisers, Coastal defence ships, Avisos, Submarines and Torpedo boats in both casemates and turrets. Its primary use on Pre-dreadnoughts, Cruisers and Coastal defence ships was as an anti-torpedo boat gun, while on Avisos, Submarines and Torpedo boats it was their secondary armament.

Ship classes that carried the 8.8 cm SK L/30 include:


See also[]

Notes[]

  1. ^ Friedman, N. (2011). Naval weapons of World War One. p p. 276
  2. ^ Friedman, N. (2011). Naval weapons of World War One. p p. 276
  3. ^ Friedman, N. (2011). Naval weapons of World War One. p p. 276
  4. ^ Friedman, N. (2011). Naval weapons of World War One. p p. 276

References[]

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