2007 VE191

2007 VE191
Discovery[1]
Discovered byMt. Lemmon Survey (G96)
Discovery date15 November 2007
Designations
2007 VE191
NEO · Apollo[2]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 7
Observation arc13 days
(last seen 2007)
Aphelion3.1065 AU (464.73 Gm) (Q)
Perihelion0.71060 AU (106.304 Gm) (q)
1.9085 AU (285.51 Gm) (a)
Eccentricity0.62767 (e)
2.64 yr (963.04 d)
12.440° (M)
0° 22m 25.752s /day (n)
Inclination5.3847° (i)
244.33° (Ω)
254.07° (ω)
Earth MOID0.000169707 AU (25,387.8 km)
Jupiter MOID1.99284 AU (298.125 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions~63 meters[3]
50–110 meters[4]
23.6[2]

2007 VE191 is a sub-kilometer asteroid, classified as near-Earth asteroid of the Apollo group that was listed on the Sentry Risk Table.[3]

Description[]

It is estimated to be roughly 63 meters in diameter. In 2015 it was known to have a 1 in 63,000 chance of impacting Earth on 27 November 2015.[3] However, the nominal best-fit orbit showed that 2007 VE191 would be roughly 0.5 AU (75,000,000 km; 46,000,000 mi) from Earth on 27 November 2015 with an apparent magnitude of roughly +25 in the constellation of Virgo about 50 degrees from the Sun,[5] and the same nominal orbit gave a distance of closest approach to Earth of a little under 0.4 AU a few weeks earlier. It was removed from the Sentry Risk Table on 17 September 2015,[6] but was still listed at NEODyS with odds of 1 in 3 million for 27 November 2015 during the approach window.[7]

2007 VE191 was discovered on 15 November 2007 by the Mount Lemmon Survey at an apparent magnitude of 20 using a 1.5-meter (59 in) reflecting telescope.[1] On 28 November 2007, it passed 0.0128 AU (1,910,000 km; 1,190,000 mi) from Earth.[8] 2007 VE191 has an observation arc of 13 days with an uncertainty parameter of 7, which means its orbit is poorly constrained.[2] 2007 VE191 was last observed on 28 November 2007.[2] By 1 December 2007, the asteroid had faded to below magnitude 25.[9]

With an absolute magnitude of 23.6,[2] 2007 VE191 is about 50–110 meters in diameter.[4]

References[]

  1. ^ a b "MPEC 2007-W05 : 2007 VE191". IAU Minor Planet Center. 16 November 2007. Retrieved 15 December 2014. (K07VJ1E)
  2. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: (2007 VE191)" (last observation: 2007-11-28; arc: 13 days). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 30 March 2016.
  3. ^ a b c "Earth Impact Risk Summary: 2007 VE191". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. Archived from the original on 5 September 2015. Retrieved 15 December 2014. (PS=–2.47)
  4. ^ a b "Absolute Magnitude (H)". NASA/JPL. Archived from the original on 2 March 2001. Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  5. ^ "2007VE191 Ephemerides for 1 September 2015 through 10 December 2015". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  6. ^ "Date/Time Removed". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. Archived from the original on 2 June 2002. Retrieved 19 October 2015.
  7. ^ "NEODyS Impactor Table for 2007VE191". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 19 October 2015. (PS=–4.87)
  8. ^ "JPL Close-Approach Data: (2007 VE191)" (last observation: 2007-11-28; arc: 13 days). Retrieved 15 December 2014.
  9. ^ "2007VE191 Ephemerides for 1 October 2007 through 4 December 2007". NEODyS (Near Earth Objects – Dynamic Site). Retrieved 15 December 2014.

External links[]