1. SSV Ulm

SSV Ulm
SSV Ulm 1846 Fussball
Full nameSchwimm- und Sportverein Ulm 1846 e.V.
Nickname(s)Die Spatzen (The Sparrows)
Founded1846
GroundDonaustadion
Capacity19,500
ChairmanPaul Sauter
ManagerHolger Bachthaler
LeagueRegionalliga Südwest (IV)
2018–196th

SSV Ulm 1846 is a German football club from Ulm, Baden-Württemberg. The modern-day football department, officially playing as SSV Ulm 1846 Fussball, was formed on 9 March 2009 when the department separated from SSV Ulm 1846.

The club's greatest success has been promotion to the Bundesliga in 1998–99, where it played for just one season. Ulm has also spent eight seasons in the 2. Bundesliga between 1979–80 and 2000–01.

History[]

The older of the two predecessor sides was founded on 12 April 1846 as Turnerbund Ulm. They had an on-again, off-again relationship with Turnverein Ulm through the 1850s. The football department became independent in 1926 as Ulmer Rasensport Verein and in 1939 would merge with Ulmer Fußball Verein, and their old clubmates in TB Ulm and TV Ulm, to form TSG Ulm 1846. In 1968, RSVgg Ulm became part of TSG Ulm 1846.

1. Schwimm- und Sportverein Ulm was formed in 1928.

Historical chart of SSV Ulm and predecessors' league performance after WWII

TSG Ulm 1846[]

Logo of SSV Ulm 1846

The football department of Turnerbund Ulm became independent in 1926 as Ulmer Rasensportverein and in 1939 would merge with Ulmer Fußballverein, and their old club mates in TB Ulm and TV Ulm, to form TSG Ulm 1846. Throughout this time the club played in local competition before joining the Gauliga Württemberg, one of sixteen top flight divisions formed in the 1933 reorganisation of German football under the Third Reich, for the 1939–40 season. The club played there until the end of World War II. After the war they began play in the 2. Oberliga Süd (II) and did well enough to make occasional advances to the Oberliga Süd (I) for short stays before falling back again. In 1963, with the formation of the Bundesliga, Germany's new top-flight professional league, TSG Ulm 1846 found itself in the Regionalliga Süd (II) for a couple of seasons before slipping to tier III and IV level play. In 1968, RSVgg Ulm became part of TSG Ulm 1846.

1. SSV Ulm[]

1. Spiel- und Sportverein Ulm was formed in 1928 and, after two seasons in the Bezirksliga Bayern, joined the Gauliga Württemberg in 1933, well before their future partner, where they earned just mid-table finishes. After the war and leading up to their union with TSG 1846, they played as a third or fourth division side. Finally, in 1970, 1. SSV Ulm merged with TSG 1846 to form SSV Ulm 1846.

SSV Ulm 1846[]

At the time of the merger. both clubs were playing football in the tier III Amateurliga Württemberg and would continue to do so for a nearly a decade. In 1980, the combined side advanced to the 2. Bundesliga Süd and would spend six of the next ten years playing at that level where, except for a fifth-place finish in 1982, their results were well down the table. After another decade in the level III Amateur Oberliga Baden-Württemberg and Regionalliga Süd, 1846 made an unexpected breakthrough after just one season in the 2. Bundesliga with a third-place finish that led to the club's promotion to the top-flight Bundesliga for the 1999–2000 season. Even though the issue was not decided until the last day of the season, Ulm could do no better than a sixteenth-place finish and returned to the second division. The 2000–01 season was an unqualified disaster for the club: they could manage only another sixteenth-place finish and were sent back down to the Regionalliga Süd (III). They were then denied a licence over the chaotic state of their finances which plunged the club down to the fifth tier Verbandsliga Württemberg. Afterwards Ulm worked their way back, to the Oberliga Baden-Württemberg (IV) in 2002, and the Regionalliga in 2008.

SSV Ulm 1846 Fußball[]

Following the 2009 European football betting scandal, the club released three allegedly involved players, Davor Kraljević, Marijo Marinović and Dinko Radojević.[1] In January 2011, the club was declared insolvent, and the results of the 2010–11 season were declared void. The club was relegated to the Oberliga Baden-Württemberg but immediately won the 2011–12 title, finishing nine points clear of second-placed VfR Mannheim and earning promotion to the new Regionalliga Südwest.

In May 2014, SSV Ulm 1846 was once again close to insolvency, for the third time in 13 years, requiring €420,000 in financial support before the end of the month to ensure survival.[2] The club eventually entered administration and was relegated back to the Oberliga. After two seasons, SSV Ulm 1846 was promoted to the Regionalliga in May 2016.[3]

Honours[]

Recent managers[]

Recent managers of the club:[4]

Manager Start Finish
Dieter Märkle 1 July 2004 28 November 2004
Marcus Sorg 29 November 2004 6 September 2007
Paul Sauter 1 July 2007 30 June 2008
Janusz Góra 7 September 2007 30 September 2007
Markus Gisdol 1 July 2008 30 June 2009
Manfred Paula 1 July 2009 24 September 2009
Frank Kaspari 25 September 2009 4 October 2009
Ralf Becker 15 October 2009 1 December 2010
Janusz Góra 2 December 2010 30 June 2011
Paul Sauter 1 July 2011 30 June 2012
Stephan Baierl 1 July 2012 13 November 2012
Paul Sauter 14 November 2012 17 October 2013
Oliver Unsöld 18 October 2013 30 June 2014
Stephan Baierl 1 July 2014 15 August 2017
Tobias Flitsch 17 August 2017 30 June 2018
Holger Bachthaler 1 July 2018 Present

Recent seasons[]

The recent season-by-season performance of the club:[5][6]

Season Division Tier Position
1999–2000 Bundesliga I 16th ↓
2000–01 2. Bundesliga II 16th ↓
2001–02 Verbandsliga Württemberg V 2nd ↑
2002–03 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg IV 2nd
2003–04 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg 6th
2004–05 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg 2nd
2005–06 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg 3rd
2006–07 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg 2nd
2007–08 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg 2nd ↑
2008–09 Regionalliga Süd 7th
2009–10 Regionalliga Süd 6th
2010–11 Regionalliga Süd ↓ due to insolvency
2011–12 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg V 1st ↑
2012–13 Regionalliga Südwest IV 10th
2013–14 Regionalliga Südwest 15th ↓
2014–15 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg V 3rd
2015–16 Oberliga Baden-Württemberg 1st ↑
2016–17 Regionalliga Südwest IV 9th
2017–18 Regionalliga Südwest 9th
2018–19 Regionalliga Südwest 6th
2019–20 Regionalliga Südwest 7th
2020–21 Regionalliga Südwest 4th
Key
Promoted Relegated

Current squad[]

Updated 25 August 2021

Note: Flags indicate national team as defined under FIFA eligibility rules. Players may hold more than one non-FIFA nationality.

No. Pos. Nation Player
4 DF Serbia SRB Milan Petrovic
5 DF Germany GER Johannes Reichert
6 DF Germany GER Thomas Geyer
7 DF Germany GER Bastian Allgeier (on loan from Karlsruher SC)
8 MF Germany GER Adrian Beck
9 FW Germany GER Phil Harres (on loan from Dynamo Dresden)
10 MF Germany GER Ardian Morina
11 FW Germany GER Anton Fink
12 GK Germany GER Marvin Seybold
14 FW Germany GER Levin Kundruweit
15 DF Germany GER Marcel Schmidts
17 MF Germany GER Jannik Rochelt
18 DF Germany GER Lennart Stoll
No. Pos. Nation Player
19 MF Germany GER Robin Heußer
20 MF Croatia CRO Fabian Benko
21 DF Germany GER Nicolas Jann
22 DF Germany GER Cedric Guarino
23 FW Germany GER Nicolas Wähling
25 GK Germany GER Niclas Heimann
26 MF Germany GER Philipp Maier
28 MF Germany GER Lukas Kiefer
30 DF Germany GER Michael Heilig
31 FW Germany GER Tobias Rühle
32 DF Germany GER Jonas Kehl (on loan from Bayern Munich II)
39 GK Germany GER Christian Ortag
42 DF Germany GER Roman Reinelt (on loan from Bayern Munich II)

Fans and Controversies[]

In the fanscene there are right-wing extremist tendencies and right-wing hooligans. In May 2019, several extremists attacked a Roma family. Four of the perpetrators had connections to the SSV Ulm fan scene. Despite a trial, the perpetrators were initially not banned from the stadium, which is why the club's management was heavily criticized by the Central Council of German Sinti and Roma.[7]

"To ignore this inhuman crime simply stunned us. Imagine if the same incident had occurred against the Jewish minority, then different measures would have been taken by the club´s management. The Holocaust clearly also includes the annihilation of half a million Sinti and Roma in Nazi occupied Europe. And the responsibility of a club management must be the same here." - Romani Rose, Chairman, Central Council of German Sinti and Roma.

In addition, there are group photos on which, among other things, the Nazi salute is shown.[8]

References[]

  1. ^ Jung, Matthias (27 November 2009). "SSV Ulm kündigt drei Spielern". N24 (in German). Retrieved 10 November 2010.
  2. ^ "Ex-Bundesligist SSV Ulm droht erneut die Insolvenz". fussball.de (in German). 20 May 2014. Retrieved 22 May 2014.
  3. ^ Vogler, Winfried (14 May 2016). "SSV Ulm 1846 ist Oberliga-Meister". Südwest Presse (in German). Retrieved 16 May 2016.
  4. ^ "SSV Ulm 1846 .:. Trainer von A-Z". weltfussball.de (in German). Retrieved 17 September 2011.
  5. ^ "Das deutsche Fußball-Archiv" (in German).
  6. ^ "Fussball.de - Ergebnisse" (in German).
  7. ^ Sport inside, Neonazis bei Traditionsvereinen | Sportschau on YouTube (in German)
  8. ^ Sport inside, Neonazis bei Traditionsvereinen | Sportschau on YouTube (in German)

External links[]