1-chlorobutane

1-Chlorobutane
Skeltal formula
Ball-and-stick model
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
1-Chlorobutane
Other names
n-Butyl chloride
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChEMBL
ChemSpider
DrugBank
ECHA InfoCard 100.003.361 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 203-696-6
RTECS number
  • EJ6300000
UNII
UN number 1127
  • InChI=1S/C4H9Cl/c1-2-3-4-5/h2-4H2,1H3 checkY
    Key: VFWCMGCRMGJXDK-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/C4H9Cl/c1-2-3-4-5/h2-4H2,1H3
    Key: VFWCMGCRMGJXDK-UHFFFAOYAR
  • ClCCCC
Properties
C4H9Cl
Molar mass 92.57 g·mol−1
Appearance Colorless liquid[1]
Density 0.89 g/mL
Melting point −123.1 °C (−189.6 °F; 150.1 K)[1]
Boiling point 78 °C (172 °F; 351 K)[1]
0.5 g/L (20 °C)[1]
Solubility Miscible with methanol, ether[citation needed]
log P 2.56[2]
Vapor pressure 103.4±0.1 mmHg at 25°C[2]
-67.10·10−6 cm3/mol
1.396[2]
Viscosity 0.4261 mPa·s[3]
Hazards
Safety data sheet Fischer MSDS
GHS pictograms GHS02: Flammable
GHS Signal word Danger
H225
P210, P233, P240, P241, P242, P243, P280, P303+361+353, P370+378, P403+235, P501
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
1
3
1
Flash point −12 °C (10 °F)[1]
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
checkY verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

1-Chlorobutane is an alkyl halide with the chemical formula CH3(CH2)3Cl. It is a colorless, flammable liquid.

Preparation and reactions[]

It can be prepared from 1-butanol by treatment with hydrogen chloride.[4]

It reacts with lithium metal to give n-butyllithium:[5]

2 Li + CH3(CH2)3Cl → CH3(CH2)3Li + LiCl

References[]

  1. ^ a b c d e Record in the GESTIS Substance Database of the Institute for Occupational Safety and Health
  2. ^ a b c "1-Chlorobutane CAS#:109-69-3".
  3. ^ Coursey, B. M.; Heric, E. L. (1971). "AApplication of the Congruence Principle to Viscosities of 1-Chloroalkane Binary Mixtures". Canadian Journal of Chemistry. 49 (16): 2631–2635. doi:10.1139/v71-437. ISSN 0008-4042.
  4. ^ Copenhaver, J. E.; Whaley, A. M. (1925). "N-Butyl Chloride". Organic Syntheses. 5: 27. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.005.0027.
  5. ^ Brandsma, L.; Verkraijsse, H. D. (1987). Preparative Polar Organometallic Chemistry I. Berlin: Springer-Verlag. ISBN 3-540-16916-4.