1-bromoethylene

Vinyl bromide
Vinyl bromide.png
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
Bromoethene
Other names
Vinyl bromide
1-Bromoethene
Bromoethylene
1-Bromoethylene
Monobromoethene
Monobromoethylene
Identifiers
  • 593-60-2 checkY
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.008.911 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 209-800-6
KEGG
RTECS number
  • KU8400000
UNII
  • InChI=1S/C2H3Br/c1-2-3/h2H,1H2 ☒N
    Key: INLLPKCGLOXCIV-UHFFFAOYSA-N ☒N
  • InChI=1/C2H3Br/c1-2-3/h2H,1H2
    Key: INLLPKCGLOXCIV-UHFFFAOYAI
  • C=CBr
Properties
C2H3Br
Molar mass 106.95 g/mol
Appearance Colorless gas
Odor pleasant[1]
Density 1.525 g/cm3 at boiling point (liquid)

1.4933 g/cm3 at 20 °C

Melting point −137.8 °C (−216.0 °F; 135.3 K)
Boiling point 15.8 °C (60.4 °F; 288.9 K)
Insoluble
log P 1.57
Vapor pressure 206.8 kPa at 37.8 °C
Hazards
Main hazards Toxic (T), Highly flammable (F+)
Safety data sheet See: data page
R-phrases (outdated) R12, R20/21/22, R36/37/38, R45
S-phrases (outdated) S45, S53
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
2
4
1
Flash point 5 °C (41 °F; 278 K)
530 °C (986 °F; 803 K)
Explosive limits 9%-15%[1]
NIOSH (US health exposure limits):
PEL (Permissible)
none[1]
REL (Recommended)
Ca[1]
IDLH (Immediate danger)
N.D.[1]
Supplementary data page
Refractive index (n),
Dielectric constantr), etc.
Thermodynamic
data
Phase behaviour
solid–liquid–gas
UV, IR, NMR, MS
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

Vinyl bromide is a simple vinyl halide. It is a colorless liquid. It is produced from ethylene dibromide. It is mainly used as a comonomer to confer fire retardant properties to acrylate polymers.[2]

Reactions and applications[]

It reacts with magnesium to give the corresponding Grignard reagent.[3]

Safety precautions[]

Vinyl bromide is listed in List of IARC Group 2A carcinogens as a suspected human carcinogen.

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ a b c d e NIOSH Pocket Guide to Chemical Hazards. "#0657". National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH).
  2. ^ Dagani, M. J.; Barda, H. J.; Benya, T. J.; Sanders, D. C. "Bromine Compounds". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a04_405.
  3. ^ Dietmar Seyferth (1959). "Di-n-butyldivinyltin". Org. Synth. 39: 10. doi:10.15227/orgsyn.039.0010.

External links[]