1,8-diazafluoren-9-one

1,8-Diazafluoren-9-one
1,8-Diazafluoren-9-one
Names
Preferred IUPAC name
9H-Cyclopenta[1,2-b:4,3-b′]dipyridin-9-one
Other names
DFO
9H-1,8-Diazafluoren-9-one
9H-Pyrido[3′,2′:3,4]cyclopenta[1,2-b]pyridin-9-one
Identifiers
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
  • InChI=1S/C11H6N2O/c14-11-9-7(3-1-5-12-9)8-4-2-6-13-10(8)11/h1-6H checkY
    Key: FOSUVSBKUIWVKI-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/C11H6N2O/c14-11-9-7(3-1-5-12-9)8-4-2-6-13-10(8)11/h1-6H
    Key: FOSUVSBKUIWVKI-UHFFFAOYAH
  • O=C1C3=C(C=CC=N3)C2=C1N=CC=C2
  • O=C3c1ncccc1c2c3nccc2
Properties
C11H6N2O
Molar mass 182.18 g/mol
Melting point 229 to 233 °C (444 to 451 °F; 502 to 506 K)
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

1,8-Diazafluoren-9-one, also known as DFO, is a chemical that is used to find fingerprints on porous surfaces. It makes fingerprints glow when they are lit by blue-green light.

DFO reacts with amino acids present in the fingerprint to form highly fluorescent derivatives. Excitation with light at ~470 nm results in emission at ~570 nm.[1]

References[]

  1. ^ Pounds, C. Anthony; Grigg, Ronald; Mongkolaussavaratana, Theeravat (1 January 1990). "The Use of 1,8-Diazafluoren-9-one (DFO) for the Fluorescent Detection of Latent Fingerprints on Paper. A Preliminary Evaluation". Journal of Forensic Sciences. 35 (1): 169–175. doi:10.1520/JFS12813J.

External links[]