1,000,000,000

1000000000
CardinalOne billion (short scale)
One thousand million, or one milliard (long scale)
OrdinalOne billionth (short scale)
Factorization29 · 59
Greek numeral
Roman numeralM
Binary1110111001101011001010000000002
Ternary21202002000210100013
Quaternary3232122302200004
Quinary40220000000005
Senary2431212453446
Octal73465450008
Duodecimal23AA9385412
Hexadecimal3B9ACA0016
VigesimalFCA000020
Base 36GJDGXS36

1,000,000,000 (one billion, short scale; one thousand million or milliard, yard,[1] long scale) is the natural number following 999,999,999 and preceding 1,000,000,001. One billion can also be written as b or bn.[2][3]

In scientific notation, it is written as 1 × 109. The metric prefix giga indicates 1,000,000,000 times the base unit. Its symbol is G.

One billion years may be called an eon in astronomy or geology.

Previously in British English (but not in American English), the word "billion" referred exclusively to a million millions (1,000,000,000,000). However, this is no longer common, and the word has been used to mean one thousand million (1,000,000,000) for several decades.[4]

The term milliard can also be used to refer to 1,000,000,000; whereas "milliard" is rarely used in English,[5] variations on this name often appear in other languages.

In the South Asian numbering system, it is known as 100 crore or 1 arab.

Visualization of powers of ten from one to 1 billion

Sense of scale[]

The facts below give a sense of how large 1,000,000,000 (109) is in the context of time according to current scientific evidence:

Time[]

Distance[]

Area[]

Volume[]

Weight[]

Products[]

Nature[]

Count[]

A is a cube; B consists of 1000 cubes the size of cube A, C consists of 1000 cubes the size of cube B; and D consists of 1000 cubes the size of cube C. Thus there are 1 million A-sized cubes in C; and 1,000,000,000 A-sized cubes in D.

Billion-cubes-new.svg

Selected 10-digit numbers (1,000,000,001–9,999,999,999)[]

1,000,000,001 to 1,999,999,999[]

2,000,000,000 to 2,999,999,999[]

3,000,000,000 to 3,999,999,999[]

4,000,000,000 to 4,999,999,999[]

5,000,000,000 to 5,999,999,999[]

6,000,000,000 to 6,999,999,999[]

7,000,000,000 to 7,999,999,999[]

8,000,000,000 to 8,999,999,999[]

9,000,000,000 to 9,999,999,999[]

References[]

  1. ^ "Yard". Investopedia. Retrieved 13 November 2017.
  2. ^ "figures". The Economist Style Guide (11th ed.). The Economist. 2015.
  3. ^ "6.5 Abbreviating 'million' and 'billion'". English Style Guide: A handbook for authors and translators in the European Commission (PDF) (8th ed.). European Commission. 3 November 2017. p. 32.
  4. ^ "How many is a billion?". OxfordDictionaries.com. Retrieved 13 November 2017.
  5. ^ "billion,thousand million,milliard". Google Ngram Viewer. Retrieved 13 November 2017.
  6. ^ "Cosmic Detectives". European Space Agency. 2 April 2013.
  7. ^ Panken, Eli (27 July 2016). "Apple Announces It Has Sold One Billion iPhones". NBCNews.com. Retrieved 13 November 2017.
  8. ^ Seethamaram, Deep (27 July 2016). "Facebook Posts Strong Profit and Revenue Growth". The Wall Street Journal. Retrieved 13 November 2017.
  9. ^ Burke, Jeremy (16 June 2015). "How the World Became A Giant Ant Colony". Atlas Obscura. Retrieved 13 November 2017.
  10. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A003617 (Smallest n-digit prime)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  11. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A093112 (a(n) = (2^n-1)^2 - 2)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  12. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A093069 (a(n) = (2^n + 1)^2 -)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  13. ^ a b c Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001006 (Motzkin numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  14. ^ a b c Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000129 (Pell numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  15. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000110 (Bell or exponential numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  16. ^ a b c Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A001190 (Wedderburn-Etherington numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  17. ^ ""World Population prospects – Population division"". population.un.org. United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved November 9, 2019.
  18. ^ ""Overall total population" – World Population Prospects: The 2019 Revision" (xslx). population.un.org (custom data acquired via website). United Nations Department of Economic and Social Affairs, Population Division. Retrieved November 9, 2019.
  19. ^ a b Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A003226 (Automorphic numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2019-04-06.
  20. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A054377 (Primary pseudoperfect numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  21. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A005165 (Alternating factorials)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  22. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A004490 (Colossally abundant numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  23. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A002201 (Superior highly composite numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  24. ^ Sloane, N. J. A. (ed.). "Sequence A000396 (Perfect numbers)". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation.
  25. ^ "Greatest prime number with 10 digits". Wolfram Alpha. Retrieved 13 November 2017.