-40 (number)

← 39 40 41 →
Cardinalforty
Ordinal40th
(fortieth)
Numeral systemquadragesimal
Factorization23 × 5
Divisors1, 2, 4, 5, 8, 10, 20, 40
Greek numeralΜ´
Roman numeralXL
Latin prefixquadrage-
Binary1010002
Ternary11113
Octal508
Duodecimal3412
Hexadecimal2816

40 (forty) is the natural number following 39 and preceding 41.

Though the word is related to "four" (4), the spelling "forty" replaced "fourty" in the course of the 17th century[1][2] and is now the standard form.

In mathematics[]

In science[]

Astronomy[]

In religion[]

The number 40 is found in many traditions without any universal explanation for its use. In Jewish, Christian, Islamic, and other Middle Eastern traditions it is taken to represent a large, approximate number, similar to "umpteen".

Sumerian[]

A large number of myths about Enki have been collected from many sites, stretching from Southern Iraq to the Levantine coast. He figures in the earliest extant cuneiform inscriptions throughout the region and was prominent from the third millennium down to Hellenistic times.

The exact meaning of his name is uncertain: the common translation is "Lord of the Earth": the Sumerian en is translated as a title equivalent to "lord"; it was originally a title given to the High Priest; ki means "earth"; but there are theories that ki in this name has another origin, possibly kig of unknown meaning, or kur meaning "mound". The name Ea is allegedly Hurrian in origin while others claim that it is possibly of Semitic origin and may be a derivation from the West-Semitic root *hyy meaning "life" in this case used for "spring", "running water." In Sumerian E-A means "the house of water", and it has been suggested that this was originally the name for the shrine to the God at Eridu.

Judaism[]

  1. He went up on the seventh day of Sivan, after God gave the Torah to the Jewish people, in order to learn the Torah from God, and came down on the seventeenth day of Tammuz, when he saw the Jews worshiping the Golden Calf and broke the tablets (Deuteronomy 9:11).
  2. He went up on the eighteenth day of Tammuz to beg forgiveness for the people's sin and came down without God's atonement on the twenty-ninth day of Av (Deuteronomy 9:25).
  3. He went up on the first day of Elul and came down on the tenth day of Tishrei, the first Yom Kippur, with God's atonement (Deuteronomy 10:10).

Christianity[]

Christianity similarly uses forty to designate important time periods.[8]

Islam[]

Yazidism[]

Funerary customs[]

Hinduism[]

In the Hindu system some of the popular fasting periods consist 40 days and is called the period One 'Mandala Kalam' Kalam means a period and Mandala Kalam means a period of 40 days. For example, the devotees (male and female) of Swami Ayyappa, the name of a Hindu god very popular in Kerala, India (Sabarimala Swami Ayyappan) strictly observed forty days fasting and visit (since female devotees of a certain biological age group wouldn't be able to perform the continuous 40-day-austerities, they wouldn't enter into the god's temple until September 2018) with their holy submission or offerings on 41st or a convenient day after a minimum 40 days practice of fasting. The offering is called "Kaanikka".

Buddhism[]

Sikhism[]

In entertainment[]

In sports[]

In other fields[]

Forty is also:

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ Google nGrams
  2. ^ Oxford English Dictionary, 1st ion, s.v.
  3. ^ "Sloane's A000567 : Octagonal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  4. ^ "Sloane's A002411 : Pentagonal pyramidal numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  5. ^ "Sloane's A005835 : Pseudoperfect (or semiperfect) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  6. ^ "Sloane's A028442 : Numbers n such that Mertens' function is zero". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  7. ^ "Sloane's A005349 : Niven (or Harshad) numbers". The On-Line Encyclopedia of Integer Sequences. OEIS Foundation. Retrieved 2016-05-31.
  8. ^ a b Michael David Coogan, A Brief Introduction to the Old Testament: The Hebrew Bible in Its Context, Oxford, 2008, p. 116
  9. ^ "Flogging".
  10. ^ Qur'an 5:25–26
  11. ^ Qur'an 7:142
  12. ^ Sesame Street. Season 40. Episode 4187. November 10, 2009. PBS.
  13. ^ Dallal, Tamalyn (2007). 40 Days & 1001 Nights. Seattle: Melati Press. back cover. ISBN 978-0-9795155-0-7.
  14. ^ "40 Days & 1001 Nights - One Woman's Dance Through Life in the Islamic World".

Further reading[]

External links[]