(NH4)3PO4

Ammonium phosphate[1]
Ammonium phosphate.png
Ball-and-stick model of three ammonium cations and one phosphate anion
Names
IUPAC name
ammonium phosphate
Other names
triammonium phosphate
Identifiers
  • 10361-65-6  checkY
3D model (JSmol)
ChemSpider
ECHA InfoCard 100.030.709 Edit this at Wikidata
EC Number
  • 269-789-9
UNII
  • InChI=1S/3H3N.H3O4P/c;;;1-5(2,3)4/h3*1H3;(H3,1,2,3,4) checkY
    Key: ZRIUUUJAJJNDSS-UHFFFAOYSA-N checkY
  • InChI=1/3H3N.H3O4P/c;;;1-5(2,3)4/h3*1H3;(H3,1,2,3,4)
    Key: ZRIUUUJAJJNDSS-UHFFFAOYAA
  • [O-]P([O-])([O-])=O.[NH4+].[NH4+].[NH4+]
Properties
(NH4)3PO4
Molar mass 149.09 g/mol
Appearance White, tetrahedral crystals
58.0 g/100 mL (25 °C)
Hazards
GHS pictograms GHS07: Harmful
GHS Signal word Warning
H302, H319
P264, P270, P280, P301+312, P305+351+338, P330, P337+313, P501
NFPA 704 (fire diamond)
2
0
0
Thermochemistry
−1671.9 kJ/mol
Related compounds
Other cations
Trisodium phosphate
Tripotassium phosphate
Related compounds
Diammonium phosphate
Monoammonium phosphate
Except where otherwise noted, data are given for materials in their standard state (at 25 °C [77 °F], 100 kPa).
☒N verify (what is checkY☒N ?)
Infobox references

Ammonium phosphate is the inorganic compound with the formula (NH4)3PO4. It is the ammonium salt of orthophosphoric acid. A related "double salt", (NH4)3PO4.(NH4)2HPO4 is also recognized but is impractical use. Both triammonium salts evolve ammonia. In contrast to the unstable nature of the triammonium salts, the diammonium phosphate (NH4)2HPO4 and monoammonium salt (NH4)H2PO4 are stable materials that are commonly used as fertilizers to provide plants with fixed nitrogen and phosphorus.[2]

Preparation of triammonium phosphate[]

Triammonium phosphate can be prepared in the laboratory by treating 85% phosphoric acid with 30% ammonia solution:[citation needed]

H3PO4 + 3 NH3 → (NH4)3PO4

(NH4)3PO4 is a colorless, crystalline solid. The solid, which has the odor of ammonia, is readily soluble in water. The salt converts to diammonium hydrogen phosphate (NH4)2HPO4.

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ Lide, David R. (1998). Handbook of Chemistry and Physics (87 ed.). Boca Raton, Florida: CRC Press. pp. 4–42, 5–19. ISBN 978-0-8493-0594-8.
  2. ^ Schrödter, Klaus; Bettermann, Gerhard; Staffel, Thomas; Wahl, Friedrich; Klein, Thomas; Hofmann, Thomas (2008). "Phosphoric Acid and Phosphates". Ullmann's Encyclopedia of Industrial Chemistry. Weinheim: Wiley-VCH. doi:10.1002/14356007.a19_465.pub3.