(91205) 1998 US43

(91205) 1998 US43
Discovery [1]
Discovered byM. W. Buie
Discovery siteKitt Peak National Obs.
Discovery date22 October 1998
Designations
(91205) 1998 US43
1998 US43
TNO[2] · plutino[3]
distant[1]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 27 April 2019 (JD 2458600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 4
Observation arc17.29 yr (6,314 d)
Aphelion44.196 AU
Perihelion33.932 AU
39.064 AU
Eccentricity0.1314
244.16 yr (89,179 d)
66.411°
0° 0m 14.4s / day
Inclination10.628°
223.94°
138.70°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
111 km (est.)[3]
154 km (est.)[4]
0.04 (assumed)[4]
0.09 (assumed)[3]
BB–BR[3]
B–R = 1.185[5]
B–V = 0.691[5]
R–I = 0.323[5]
V–R = 0.494[5]
8.0[1][2]

(91205) 1998 US43, provisional designation 1998 US43, is a resonant trans-Neptunian object of the plutino group, located in the Kuiper belt in the outermost region of the Solar System. The rather bluish body measures approximately 111 kilometers (69 miles) in diameter.[3] It was discovered on 22 October 1998, by American astronomer Marc Buie at the Kitt Peak National Observatory in the United States.[1] It is probably not a dwarf planet candidate.[4]

Classification and orbit[]

1998 US43 belongs to the plutino population,[3] which are named after the groups largest member, Pluto. Plutinos are resonant trans-Neptunian objects in 2:3 resonance with Neptune, orbiting the Sun twice for every three orbits Neptune does.

It orbits the Sun at a distance of 33.9–44.2 AU once every 244 years and 2 months (89,179 days; semi-major axis of 39.06 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.13 and an inclination of 11° with respect to the ecliptic.[2] The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation. Its orbit still has a fair amount of uncertainty.[1]

Numbering and naming[]

This minor planet was numbered by the Minor Planet Center on 28 October 2004 (M.P.C. 52912).[6] As of 2018, it has not been named.[1]

Physical characteristics[]

Based on an absolute magnitude of 8.0 and an assumed albedo of 0.09, the Johnston's Archive estimates a diameter of 111 kilometers.[3] The body's spectrum (BB–BR) suggests a somewhat bluish color.[3] As of 2018, no rotational lightcurve of 1998 US43 has been obtained from photometric observations.[2][7] 1998 US43 it an unlikely dwarf planet candidate due to its small size, estimated by Michael Brown to measure 154 kilometers with a low albedo of 0.04.[4]

References[]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "91205 (1998 US43)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 19 November 2018.
  2. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 91205 (1998 US43)" (2016-02-04 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 19 November 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e f g h "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. 7 October 2018. Retrieved 19 November 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d Brown, Michael E. "How many dwarf planets are there in the outer solar system?". California Institute of Technology. Retrieved 19 November 2018.
  5. ^ a b c d "Asteroid (91205) 1998 US43". Small Bodies Data Ferret. Retrieved 19 November 2018.
  6. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 19 November 2018.
  7. ^ "LCDB Data for (91205)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 13 October 2017.

External links[]