(82) Alkmene

82 Alkmene
82Alkmene (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 82 Alkmene based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered byKarl Theodor Robert Luther
Discovery date27 November 1864
Designations
(82) Alkmene
Pronunciation/ælkˈmn/[1]
Named after
Alcmene
Main belt
AdjectivesAlkmenean /ælkˈmniən/[2]
Orbital characteristics
Epoch 9 December 2014 (JD 2457000.5)
Aphelion3.3701 AU
Perihelion2.1609 AU
2.7655 AU
Eccentricity0.2186
4.60 yr
17.70 km/s
192.56°
Inclination2.8286°
25.507°
111.27°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions61±1.5 km (IRAS)[3]
Mass2.4×1017 kg (assumed)
12.999 h[3]
0.208[3]
S[3]
8.40[3]

Alkmene (minor planet designation: 82 Alkmene) is a main-belt asteroid. Alkmene was discovered by R. Luther on 7 November 1864 and named after Alcmene, the mother of Herakles in Greek mythology. Based on IRAS data, Alkmene is estimated to be about 61 kilometres (38 mi) in diameter.[3] A satellite has been suggested based on 1985 lightcurve data.[4]

Asteroid Alkmene occulted the apparent magnitude 7.5 star HIP 99229 in the constellation of Capricornus on 18 September 2014 around 06:41 UT (17 September 23:41 PDT) and was centered on Sacramento, CA.[5][6] Alkmene projected an eclipse shadow that moves at about 3.2 km/s (2 mi/s). Asteroid occultations allow for accurate 2-dimensional mapping of an asteroids silhouette when observed by multiple telescopes separated by about 10 km (6.2 mi).

References[]

  1. ^ 'Alcmene, Alkmene' in The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia (1895)
  2. ^ Mairéad McAuley (2015), Reproducing Rome, p. 126; stress determined by verse in George Chapman, Gentleman Usher, Thomas Parrott 1907 ed., p. 220.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 82 Alkmene". Retrieved 9 September 2014.
  4. ^ http://www.johnstonsarchive.net/astro/asteroidmoonsq.html
  5. ^ Interactive GoogleMap of Shadow Path Archived 2014-09-09 at Archive.today
  6. ^ http://www.asteroidoccultation.com/2014_09/0918_82_32999.htm

External links[]