(72) Feronia

72 Feronia
72Feronia (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 72 Feronia based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered byChristian Heinrich Friedrich Peters
Discovery dateMay 29, 1861
Designations
MPC designation(72) Feronia
Pronunciation/fəˈrniə/ fə-ROH-nee-ə
Main belt
Orbital characteristics
Epoch December 31, 2006 (JD 2454100.5)
Aphelion2.539 AU (379.8 Gm)
Perihelion1.993 AU (298.1 Gm)
2.266 AU (339.0 Gm)
Eccentricity0.121
1,246.123 days (3.41 a)
146.950°
Inclination5.417°
208.137°
102.608°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions83.95±4.02 km[1]
Mass(3.32±8.49)×1018 kg[1]
Mean density
10.71±27.44 g/cm3[1]
8.09068 h[2]
287 or 102[2]
−39 or −55[2]
0.063[3]
TDG[4]
8.94

72 Feronia (/fəˈrniə/ fə-ROH-nee-ə; minor planet designation: 72 Feronia) is a quite large and dark main belt asteroid. It was the first asteroid discovery by C. H. F. Peters, on May 29, 1861,[5] from Hamilton College, New York State. It was initially thought that Peters had merely seen the already known asteroid 66 Maja, but T.H. Safford showed that it was a new body. Safford named it after Feronia, a Roman fertility goddess.[6]

The asteroid has an estimated rotation period of 8.09068 h. Hanuš et al. (2013) gives two possible solutions for the pole in ecliptic coordinates: (λ1, β1) = (287°, −39°) or (λ1, β1) = (102°, −55°). The estimated mass of 72 Feronia, and hence the density, has a large margin of error.[2]

References[]

  1. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73, pp. 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. See Table 1.
  2. ^ a b c d Hanuš, J.; et al. (September 2013), "Sizes of main-belt asteroids by combining shape models and Keck adaptive optics observations", Icarus, 226 (1): 1045−1057, arXiv:1308.0446, Bibcode:2013Icar..226.1045H, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2013.07.023.
  3. ^ Asteroid Data Sets Archived 2010-01-17 at WebCite
  4. ^ *JPL Small-Body Database Browser
  5. ^ Sheehan, William (1999), "Christian Heinrich Friedrich Peters", Biographical Memoirs, 76, National Academies Press, p. 289, ISBN 0309064341.
  6. ^ Schmadel, Lutz (2003). Dictionary of minor planet names (fifth ed.). Germany: Springer. p. 22. ISBN 3-540-00238-3. Retrieved 31 December 2008.

External links[]