(6382) 1988 EL

(6382) 1988 EL
Discovery[1]
Discovered byJ. Alu
Discovery sitePalomar Obs.
Discovery date14 March 1988
Designations
(6382) 1988 EL
1988 EL · 1983 EC1
main-belt · (inner)[1]
Hungaria[2][3]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 4 September 2017 (JD 2458000.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc29.01 yr (10,596 days)
Aphelion1.9102 AU
Perihelion1.7388 AU
1.8245 AU
Eccentricity0.0470
2.46 yr (900 days)
349.44°
0° 23m 59.64s / day
Inclination18.556°
350.60°
191.91°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions4.22 km (calculated)[3]
4.931±0.042 km[1][4]
5.311±0.013 km[5]
2.892±0.005 h[6]
2.8932±0.0005 h[7]
2.894±0.001 h[8]
2.895±0.002 h[9]
2.898±0.001 h[10]
0.1896±0.0604[5]
0.254±0.035[1][4]
0.3 (assumed)[3]
E[3] · S[8]
13.8[1][3][5] · 14.08±0.49[11]

(6382) 1988 EL, is a stony Hungaria asteroid from the inner regions of the asteroid belt, approximately 5 kilometers in diameter. It was discovered on 14 March 1988, by American astronomer Jeffrey Alu at the U.S. Palomar Observatory, California.[2]

Orbit and classification[]

The presumed E-type asteroid may not be a member of the Hungaria family, which form the innermost dense concentration of asteroids in the Solar System, but an unrelated interloper, which intruded into the Hungaria orbital space, as indicated by a lower albedos from observations by the NEOWISE mission.[7]: 169 It orbits the Sun at a distance of 1.7–1.9 AU once every 2 years and 6 months (900 days). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.05 and an inclination of 19° with respect to the ecliptic.[1] The body's first yet unused observation was made at the Chinese Purple Mountain Observatory in 1983.[2] On 13 April 2042 and on 3 October 2113, the asteroid will pass 0.086 AU (12,900,000 km) and 0.092 AU (13,800,000 km) from Mars, respectively.[1]

Rotation period[]

Between February 2005 and January 2015, American astronomer Brian D. Warner obtained 5 rotational lightcurves for this asteroid from photometric observations at the CS3–Palmer Divide Station in Colorado. The lightcurves gave a well-defined rotation period of 2.892–2.898 hours with a low brightness variation between 0.06 and 0.15 magnitude (U=2/3-/3/2+/3).[6][7][8][9][10]

Diameter and albedo[]

According to two different data sets from space-based survey carried out by the NEOWISE mission of NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, the asteroid measures 4.9 and 5.3 kilometers in diameter and its surface has an albedo of 0.19 and 0.25, respectively,[5][4] while the Collaborative Asteroid Lightcurve Link assumes an albedo of 0.30 – a compromise value between 0.4 and 0.2, corresponding to the Hungaria asteroids as collisional family and orbital group, respectively – and calculates a smaller diameter of 4.2 kilometers, based on an absolute magnitude of 13.8.[3]

Naming[]

As of 2017, 1988 EL remains unnamed.[2]

References[]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g h "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 6382 (1988 EL)" (2017-03-18 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Archived from the original on 16 December 2019. Retrieved 26 May 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d "6382 (1988 EL)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 31 August 2016.
  3. ^ a b c d e f "LCDB Data for (6382)". Asteroid Lightcurve Database (LCDB). Retrieved 31 August 2016.
  4. ^ a b c Masiero, Joseph R.; Grav, T.; Mainzer, A. K.; Nugent, C. R.; Bauer, J. M.; Stevenson, R.; et al. (August 2014). "Main-belt Asteroids with WISE/NEOWISE: Near-infrared Albedos". The Astrophysical Journal. 791 (2): 11. arXiv:1406.6645. Bibcode:2014ApJ...791..121M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/791/2/121.
  5. ^ a b c d Mainzer, A.; Grav, T.; Masiero, J.; Hand, E.; Bauer, J.; Tholen, D.; et al. (November 2011). "NEOWISE Studies of Spectrophotometrically Classified Asteroids: Preliminary Results". The Astrophysical Journal. 741 (2): 25. arXiv:1109.6407. Bibcode:2011ApJ...741...90M. doi:10.1088/0004-637X/741/2/90.
  6. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (July 2010). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2009 December - 2010 March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 37 (3): 112–118. Bibcode:2010MPBu...37..112W. ISSN 1052-8091.
  7. ^ a b c Warner, Brian D. (July 2015). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at CS3-Palmer Divide Station: 2014 December - 2015 March". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 42 (3): 167–172. Bibcode:2015MPBu...42..167W. ISSN 1052-8091.
  8. ^ a b c Warner, Brian D. (April 2012). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory: 2011 September - December". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 39 (2): 69–80. Bibcode:2012MPBu...39...69W. ISSN 1052-8091.
  9. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (September 2005). "Asteroid lightcurve analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - winter 2004-2005". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 32 (3): 54–58. Bibcode:2005MPBu...32...54W. ISSN 1052-8091.
  10. ^ a b Warner, Brian D. (March 2007). "Asteroid Lightcurve Analysis at the Palmer Divide Observatory - June-September 2006". The Minor Planet Bulletin. 34 (1): 8–10. Bibcode:2007MPBu...34....8W. ISSN 1052-8091.
  11. ^ Veres, Peter; Jedicke, Robert; Fitzsimmons, Alan; Denneau, Larry; Granvik, Mikael; Bolin, Bryce; et al. (November 2015). "Absolute magnitudes and slope parameters for 250,000 asteroids observed by Pan-STARRS PS1 - Preliminary results". Icarus. 261: 34–47. arXiv:1506.00762. Bibcode:2015Icar..261...34V. doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2015.08.007.

External links[]