(224) Oceana

224 Oceana
Discovery
Discovered byJohann Palisa
Discovery date30 March 1882
Designations
(224) Oceana
Pronunciation/ʃˈnə/,[1] /ʃˈɑːnə/[2]
Named after
Pacific Ocean
A899 EA, 1933 HO
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc117.02 yr (42742 d)
Aphelion2.75930 AU (412.785 Gm)
Perihelion2.53086 AU (378.611 Gm)
2.64508 AU (395.698 Gm)
Eccentricity0.043182
4.30 yr (1571.3 d)
18.31 km/s
1.46287°
0° 13m 44.8s / day
Inclination5.84243°
352.815°
284.346°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions61.82±2.1 km
9.401 h (0.3917 d)[4][3]
0.1694±0.012
M
8.59

Oceana (minor planet designation: 224 Oceana) is an asteroid from the asteroid belt. It was discovered by Austrian astronomer Johann Palisa on 30 March 1882, in Vienna. It was named after the Pacific Ocean. Based upon its spectrum, it is classified as an M-type asteroid, but is not metallic.

A light curve generated from photometric observations of this asteroid at Pulkovo Observatory show a rotation period of 9.401 ± 0.001 hours and a brightness variation of 0.09 ± 0.01 in magnitude.[4]

224 Oceana was one of five minor planets included in the 1993 study, Transition Comets -- UV Search for OH Emissions in Asteroids, which was research involving amateur astronomers who were permitted to make use of the Hubble Space Telescope.

References[]

  1. ^ "Oceana". Oxford English Dictionary (Online ed.). Oxford University Press. (Subscription or participating institution membership required.)
  2. ^ Noah Webster (1884) A Practical Dictionary of the English Language
  3. ^ a b "224 Oceana". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  4. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (October 2011), "Rotation Period Determinations for 11 Parthenope, 38 Leda, 111 Ate 194 Prokne, 217 Eudora, and 224 Oceana", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 38 (4), pp. 183–185, Bibcode:2011MPBu...38..183P.

External links[]