(214) Aschera

214 Aschera
Discovery
Discovered byJohann Palisa
Discovery date29 February 1880
Designations
(214) Aschera
Pronunciation/əˈʃɪərə/[1]
A903 SE, 1947 BP,
1948 JE, 1949 QG2,
1949 SX1, 1950 XH,
1953 OO
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc136.09 yr (49707 d)
Aphelion2.6938 AU (402.99 Gm)
Perihelion2.5279 AU (378.17 Gm)
2.6108 AU (390.57 Gm)
Eccentricity0.031762
4.22 yr (1540.9 d)
18.43 km/s
167.065°
0° 14m 1.068s / day
Inclination3.4364°
341.997°
131.579°
Physical characteristics
Dimensions23.16±1.0 km
6.835 h (0.2848 d)
0.5220±0.048
E
9.2

Aschera (minor planet designation: 214 Aschera) is a Main belt asteroid. It was discovered by Austrian astronomer Johann Palisa on February 29, 1880, in Pola and was named after the Sidonian goddess Asherah.

It is classified as a rare E-type asteroid and is fairly faint for an object of its type. The overall diameter is estimated to be 23 km and it has a geometric albedo of 0.52.[3] Photometric observations show a rotation period of 6.835 ± 0.001 hours with a brightness variation of 0.20 in magnitude. Using a tri-axial ellipsoidal model derived from light curve data, the overall shape of the asteroid is estimated to be a/b = 1.24 ± 0.12 and b/c = 1.83 ± 0.10, where a/b/c are the three axes of an ellipsoid.[4]

References[]

  1. ^ "Asherah". Merriam-Webster Dictionary.
  2. ^ "214 Aschera". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 12 May 2016.
  3. ^ Mishchenko, Michael I.; Rosenbush, Vera K. (2011), "Opposition Optical Phenomenon in Planetary Astrophysics: Observational Results", Polarimetric Detection, Characterization and Remote Sensing, Springer Science & Business Media, p. 417, ISBN 9400716354.
  4. ^ Shevchenko, V. G.; et al. (August 2003), "Rotation and photometric properties of E-type asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 51 (9–10): 525–532, Bibcode:2003P&SS...51..525S, doi:10.1016/S0032-0633(03)00076-X.

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