(199) Byblis

199 Byblis
199Byblis (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 199 Byblis based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered byC. H. F. Peters, 1879
Discovery date9 July 1879
Designations
(199) Byblis
Pronunciation/ˈbɪblɪs/[1]
Main belt
AdjectivesByblian /ˈbɪbliən/[2]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc136.39 yr (49817 d)
Aphelion3.7367 AU (559.00 Gm)
Perihelion2.5996 AU (388.89 Gm)
3.1682 AU (473.96 Gm)
Eccentricity0.17946
5.64 yr (2059.7 d)
86.623°
0° 10m 29.208s / day
Inclination15.474°
88.589°
180.18°
Earth MOID1.58338 AU (236.870 Gm)
Jupiter MOID1.372 AU (205.2 Gm)
TJupiter3.122
Physical characteristics[4]
Mean radius
38.06±0.30 km
5.2201 h (0.21750 d)
0.11±0.01
8.5

199 Byblis (minor planet designation: 199 Byblis) is a medium-sized main belt asteroid.

It was discovered by C. H. F. Peters on July 9, 1879, in Clinton, New York and named after Byblis, an incestuous lover in Greek mythology.

References[]

  1. ^ Benjamin Smith (1903) The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  2. ^ The works of Lucian (1780)
  3. ^ "199 Byblis". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 6 May 2016.
  4. ^ JPL Small-Body Database Browser

External links[]