(195) Eurykleia

195 Eurykleia
Discovery
Discovered byJ. Palisa, 1879
Discovery date19 April 1879
Designations
(195) Eurykleia
Pronunciation/jʊrɪˈklə/[1]
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc131.99 yr (48,208 d)
Aphelion3.00 AU (449.33 Gm)
Perihelion2.75 AU (411.29 Gm)
2.88 AU (430.30 Gm)
Eccentricity0.044205
4.88 yr (1,781.9 d)
113.56°
0° 12m 7.308s / day
Inclination6.9718°
6.9930°
119.12°
Earth MOID1.77 AU (264.87 Gm)
Jupiter MOID2.01 AU (300.95 Gm)
TJupiter3.284
Physical characteristics
Mean radius
42.855±0.85 km
16.52178±0.00001 h[3]
0.0599±0.002
Ch[3]
9.01

Eurykleia (minor planet designation: 195 Eurykleia) is a fairly large main belt asteroid. It was discovered by the Austrian astronomer Johann Palisa on April 19, 1879, and named after Euryclea, the wet-nurse of Odysseus in The Odyssey.

This body is orbiting the Sun with a period of 4.88 years and a low eccentricity (ovalness) of 0.04. The orbital plane is inclined by 7° from the plane of the ecliptic. It is spinning with a rotation period of 16.5 hours and varies in brightness with an amplitude of 0.24 magnitude. The cross-section diameter of this body is 43 km. The asteroid has a taxonomic type of Ch in the SMASS classification,[3] which indicates it has a dark surface with a primitive carbonaceous composition.

References[]

  1. ^ "Euryclea". Dictionary.com Unabridged. Random House.
  2. ^ "195 Eurykleia". JPL Small-Body Database. NASA/Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 6 May 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Marciniak, A.; et al. (May 2019). "Thermal properties of slowly rotating asteroids: results from a targeted survey". Astronomy & Astrophysics. 625: 40. arXiv:1905.06056. Bibcode:2019A&A...625A.139M. doi:10.1051/0004-6361/201935129. A139.

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