(184212) 2004 PB112

(184212) 2004 PB112
Discovery[1]
Discovered byM. W. Buie
Discovery siteCerro Tololo Obs.
Discovery date13 August 2004
Designations
(184212) 2004 PB112
2004 PB112
TNO[2] · SDO[3][4]
res 4:27[5]
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 1 July 2021 (JD 2459396.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3[2] · 0[1]
Observation arc17.07 yr (6,236 d)
Aphelion184.60 AU
Perihelion35.333 AU
109.97 AU
Eccentricity0.6787
1153.20 yrs
3.0647°
0° 0m 3.24s / day
Inclination15.403°
356.73°
3.6578°
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
154 km (est. at 0.09)[3][6]
7.3[1][2]

(184212) 2004 PB112, prov. designation: 2004 PB112, is a trans-Neptunian object from the scattered disc, approximately 154 kilometers (96 miles) in diameter, and in a rare high-order orbital resonance ratio (4:27) with Neptune. It was discovered on 13 August 2004, by American astronomer Marc Buie at the Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory in Chile.[1]

Orbit and classification[]

2004 PB112 orbits the Sun at a distance of 35.3–184.6 AU once every 1153 years and 2 months (421,205 days; semi-major axis of 109.97 AU). Its orbit has a high eccentricity of 0.68 and an inclination of 15° with respect to the ecliptic.[2] A first precovery was taken at Cerro Tololo in 2000, extending the body's observation arc by 4 years prior to its official discovery observation.[1]

2004 PB112 reached perihelion on 5 October 2011 (JD 2455839.806).[2] It has been classified as a highly unusual 4:27 resonant trans-Neptunian object,[5]: 49  but also simply as a scattered disc object,[3] or SCATNEAR, respectively, by the Deep Ecliptic Survey.[4]

Numbering and naming[]

This minor planet was numbered (184212) by the Minor Planet Center on 20 April 2008 (M.P.C. 62608).[7] As of 2021, it has not been named.[1]

Physical characteristics[]

Based on a generic conversion from an absolute magnitude of 7.2, 2004 PB112 measures between 100 and 220 kilometer in diameter.[6] Johnston's Archive estimates a mean-diameter of 154 kilometers (96 miles) assuming a typical albedo of 0.09.[3]

References[]

  1. ^ a b c d e f "184212 (2004 PB112)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 24 April 2017.
  2. ^ a b c d e f "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 184212 (2004 PB112)" (2008-10-30 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 1 June 2017.
  3. ^ a b c d Johnston, Wm. Robert (18 August 2020). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 24 July 2021.
  4. ^ a b "Orbit Fit and Astrometric record for 184212". Southwest Research Institute. Retrieved 5 January 2019.The Deep Ecliptic Survey Object Classifications
  5. ^ a b Brett Gladman; Brian G. Marsden; Christa VanLaerhoven. "Nomenclature in the Outer Solar System" (PDF) (PDF). Retrieved 24 April 2017.
  6. ^ a b "Asteroid Size Estimator". CNEOS NASA/JPL. Retrieved 24 July 2021.
  7. ^ "MPC/MPO/MPS Archive". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 24 July 2021.

External links[]