(179806) 2002 TD66

(179806) 2002 TD66
Discovery
Discovered byLINEAR
Discovery siteLincoln Lab ETS
Discovery date5 October 2002
Designations
NEO · Apollo
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc2017 days (5.52 yr)
Aphelion2.8505 AU (426.43 Gm)
Perihelion0.86543 AU (129.466 Gm)
1.8580 AU (277.95 Gm)
Eccentricity0.53421
2.53 yr (925.03 d)
55.037°
0° 23m 21.048s / day
Inclination4.9211°
335.73°
125.66°
Earth MOID0.00603808 AU (903,284 km)
Jupiter MOID2.35661 AU (352.544 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Dimensions300 meters[2]
270–590 meters H
9.455 h (0.3940 d)[2][1]
20.2[1]

(179806) 2002 TD66 (also written 2002 TD66) is a sub-kilometer asteroid, classified as near-Earth object of the Apollo group. It was discovered on 5 October 2002, by the LINEAR project at Lincoln Laboratory's ETS in Socorro, New Mexico.[1] It was announced on 7 October 2002 and appeared later that day on the JPL current risk page.

Description[]

Due to the proximity of its orbit to Earth and its estimated size, this object has been classified as a potentially hazardous asteroid (PHA) by the Minor Planet Center in Cambridge, Massachusetts. In November 2006 there were 823 PHAs known. As of October 2011, there are 1261 PHAs known.[3] 2002 TD66 was removed from the Sentry Risk Table on October 10, 2002.[4] A Doppler observation[1] has helped produce a well known trajectory with a condition code (Uncertainty Parameter U) of 0.[1]

Based on an absolute magnitude (H) of 20.2,[1] the asteroid is estimated to be between 270 and 590 meters in diameter. Radar astronomy shows it is a contact binary asteroid with a diameter of 300 meters and a rotation period of 9.5 hours.[2]

On February 26, 2008, 2002 TD66 passed 0.04282 AU (6,406,000 km; 3,980,000 mi) from Earth.[5] The asteroid also comes close to Venus, Mars, and dwarf planet Ceres.[5]

References[]

  1. ^ a b c d e f g "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 179806 (2002 TD66)" (2008-04-13 last obs). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 7 April 2016. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  2. ^ a b c Dr. Lance A. M. Benner (18 November 2013). "Binary and Ternary near-Earth Asteroids detected by radar". NASA/JPL Asteroid Radar Research. Retrieved 1 March 2014. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  3. ^ "Potentially Hazard Asteroids". Retrieved 24 October 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  4. ^ "Date/Time Removed". NASA/JPL Near-Earth Object Program Office. Retrieved 24 October 2011. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)
  5. ^ a b "JPL Close-Approach Data: 179806 (2002 TD66)" (2008-04-13 last obs). Retrieved 1 November 2006. CS1 maint: discouraged parameter (link)

External links[]