(163249) 2002 GT

(163249) 2002 GT
Discovery
Discovered bySpacewatch
Discovery siteKitt Peak National Obs.
Discovery date3 April 2002
Designations
(163249) 2002 GT
NEO · PHA · Apollo[1]
Orbital characteristics[1]
Epoch 13 January 2016 (JD 2457400.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc5114 days (14.00 yr)
Aphelion1.7945 AU (268.45 Gm)
Perihelion0.89422 AU (133.773 Gm)
1.3444 AU (201.12 Gm)
Eccentricity0.33483
1.56 yr (569.33 d)
196.65°
0° 37m 56.352s / day (n)
Inclination6.9681°
201.76°
135.09°
Earth MOID0.0161099 AU (2.41001 Gm)
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
350-500 m[2]
3.7663 h (0.15693 d)
18.4[1]

(163249) 2002 GT is an Apollo asteroid with an absolute magnitude of 18.26.[1] It is a potentially hazardous asteroid as its orbit crosses that of Earth.[3]

Description[]

In 2011, NASA considered sending the unmanned spacecraft Deep Impact toward the asteroid with the aim of performing a flyby[3] in 2020. It was uncertain whether Deep Impact carried sufficient fuel for this operation.[3]

On 24 November 2011 and 4 October 2012, the space probe's thrusters were fired briefly for two trajectory correction maneuvers that targeted Deep Impact for an encounter with 2002 GT in 2020, possibly within a distance of no more than 400 kilometers. However, funding for the flyby mission was not guaranteed.[4] In June 2013 the asteroid was observed in radar by the Arecibo Observatory.[5]

However, on 8 August 2013 NASA lost communication with the spacecraft, and on 20 September 2013, NASA abandoned further attempts to contact the craft.[6] According to A'Hearn,[7] the most probable reason of software malfunction was a Y2K-like problem (at 11 August 2013 0:38:49 it was 232 deciseconds from 1 January 2000[8]).

See also[]

References[]

  1. ^ a b c d "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 163249 (2002 GT)". 4 March 2009. Retrieved 7 April 2016.
  2. ^ 45th Meeting of the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences, October 2013, page 6
  3. ^ a b c Stephen Clark, "Deep Impact sets path for asteroid encounter in 2020". Spaceflight Now. 18 December 2011.
  4. ^ Emily Lakdawalla blog entry: "Deep Impact targets possible 2020 asteroid flyby". 5 October 2012.
  5. ^ Asteroid and Comet Mission Targets Observed by Radar (archived version, 19 Dec 2013)
  6. ^ NASA calls off search for lost Deep Impact comet probe - Australian Broadcasting Corporation - Retrieved 21 September 2013.
  7. ^ "NASA Declares End to Deep Impact Comet Mission Communication cutoff leads to loss of comet hunter, say space officials". National Geographic. 20 September 2013.
  8. ^ "Re: [tz] Deep Impact: wrong time zone?". tz@iana.org. 23 September 2013. Archived from the original on 2 October 2013. Retrieved 23 September 2020.

External links[]