(160) Una

160 Una
160Una (Lightcurve Inversion).png
A three-dimensional model of 160 Una based on its light curve.
Discovery
Discovered byC. H. F. Peters
Discovery date20 February 1876
Designations
(160) Una
Pronunciation/ˈjnə/[1]
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc118.30 yr (43209 d)
Aphelion2.90877 AU (435.146 Gm)
Perihelion2.54727 AU (381.066 Gm)
2.72802 AU (408.106 Gm)
Eccentricity0.066257
4.51 yr (1645.8 d)
18.01 km/s
144.472°
0° 13m 7.471s / day
Inclination3.82512°
8.60989°
52.8418°
Earth MOID1.56031 AU (233.419 Gm)
Jupiter MOID2.30107 AU (344.235 Gm)
TJupiter3.349
Physical characteristics
Dimensions81.24±2.1 km
Mass5.6×1017 kg (assumed)
Mean density
2.0? g/cm³
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0227 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0429 km/s
11.033 h (0.4597 d) [2]
0.234 d (5.61 h) [3][4]
0.0625±0.003[2]
0.063 [5]
Temperature~170 K
C[6]
9.08,[2] 8.95 [7]

Una (minor planet designation: 160 Una) is a fairly large and dark, primitive Main belt asteroid that was discovered by German-American astronomer C. H. F. Peters on February 20, 1876, in Clinton, New York.[8] It is named after a character in Edmund Spenser's epic poem The Faerie Queene (1590).

In the Tholen classification system it is categorized as a CX-type, while the Bus asteroid taxonomy system lists it as an Xk asteroid.[9] Photometric observations of this asteroid made at the Torino Observatory in Italy during 1990–1991 were used to determine a synodic rotation period of 5.61 ± 0.01 hours.[3]

References[]

  1. ^ Benjamin Smith (1903) The Century Dictionary and Cyclopedia
  2. ^ a b c d Yeomans, Donald K., "160 Una", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 12 May 2016.
  3. ^ a b di Martino, M.; et al. (February 1994), "Lightcurves and rotational periods of nine main belt asteroids", Icarus, 107 (2), pp. 269–275, Bibcode:1994Icar..107..269D, doi:10.1006/icar.1994.1022.
  4. ^ "Lightcurves and map data on numbered asteroids N° 1 to 52225". Archived from the original on 27 November 2005. Retrieved 3 November 2008.
  5. ^ "Infrared Astronomical Satellite (IRAS)". Archived from the original on 24 February 2005. Retrieved 24 February 2005.
  6. ^ [1]
  7. ^ Warner, Brian D. (December 2007), "Initial Results of a Dedicated H-G Project", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 34, pp. 113–119, Bibcode:2007MPBu...34..113W.
  8. ^ "Numbered Minor Planets 1–5000", Discovery Circumstances, IAU Minor Planet center, retrieved 7 April 2013.
  9. ^ DeMeo, Francesca E.; et al. (July 2009), "An extension of the Bus asteroid taxonomy into the near-infrared" (PDF), Icarus, 202 (1), pp. 160–180, Bibcode:2009Icar..202..160D, doi:10.1016/j.icarus.2009.02.005, archived from the original (PDF) on 17 March 2014, retrieved 8 April 2013. See appendix A.

External links[]