(144908) 2004 YH32

(144908) 2004 YH32
Discovery[1][2]
Discovered bySSS
Discovery siteSiding Spring Obs.
Discovery date18 December 2004
Designations
(144908) 2004 YH32
2004 YH32
centaur[3] · damocloid[4]
unusual[5] · distant[1]
Orbital characteristics[3]
Epoch 27 April 2019 (JD 2458600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 3
Observation arc2.08 yr (758 d)
Aphelion12.777 AU
Perihelion3.5507 AU
8.1641 AU
Eccentricity0.5651
23.33 yr (8,520 d)
212.33°
0° 2m 32.28s / day
Inclination78.978°
47.727°
348.73°
TJupiter1.0330
Physical characteristics
Mean diameter
12 km[4]
0.09 (assumed)[4]
12.9[1][3]

(144908) 2004 YH32, provisional designation 2004 YH32, is a centaur and damocloid orbiting the Sun with a very high inclination of almost 80°.[3] It was discovered on 18 December 2004 by the Siding Spring Survey at the Siding Spring Observatory in Australia. The critical and unusual object measures approximately 12 kilometers (7.5 miles) in diameter.[1]

Orbit and classification[]

It orbits the Sun at a distance of 3.6–12.8 AU once every 23 years and 4 months (8,520 days; semi-major axis of 8.16 AU). Its orbit has an eccentricity of 0.57 and an inclination of 79° with respect to the ecliptic.[3] The body's observation arc begins with its official discovery observation at the Siding Spring Observatory in December 2004.[1]

Physical characteristics[]

Johnston's Archive assumes a standard albedo of 0.09 and calculates a diameter of 12 kilometers based on an absolute magnitude of 12.9.[4]

References[]

  1. ^ a b c d e "144908 (2004 YH32)". Minor Planet Center. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  2. ^ "MPEC 2004-Y61 : 2004 YH32". Minor Planet Center. 25 December 2004. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  3. ^ a b c d e "JPL Small-Body Database Browser: 144908 (2004 YH32)" (2007-01-15 last obs.). Jet Propulsion Laboratory. Retrieved 20 November 2018.
  4. ^ a b c d Johnston, Wm. Robert (15 October 2017). "List of Known Trans-Neptunian Objects". Johnston's Archive. Retrieved 17 January 2018.
  5. ^ "List Of Other Unusual Objects". Minor Planet Center. 14 November 2018. Retrieved 20 November 2018.

External links[]