(112) Iphigenia

112 Iphigenia
Discovery
Discovered byChristian Heinrich Friedrich Peters
Discovery date19 September 1870
Designations
(112) Iphigenia
Pronunciation/ˌɪfɪɪˈnə/[1]
Named after
Iphigenia
Main belt
Orbital characteristics[2]
Epoch 31 July 2016 (JD 2457600.5)
Uncertainty parameter 0
Observation arc145.57 yr (53169 d)
Aphelion2.7461 AU (410.81 Gm)
Perihelion2.12225 AU (317.484 Gm)
2.43415 AU (364.144 Gm)
Eccentricity0.12813
3.80 yr (1387.1 d)
19.01 km/s
169.984°
0° 15m 34.308s / day
Inclination2.6029°
323.538°
16.676°
Earth MOID1.11284 AU (166.478 Gm)
Jupiter MOID2.60275 AU (389.366 Gm)
TJupiter3.493
Physical characteristics
Dimensions72.18±4.4 km[2]
71.07 ± 0.52 km[3]
Mass(1.97 ± 6.78) × 1018 kg[3]
Mean density
10.48 ± 36.06 g/cm3[3]
Equatorial surface gravity
0.0202 m/s²
Equatorial escape velocity
0.0382 km/s
31.466 h (1.3111 d)[2][4]
0.0393±0.005
Temperature~178 K
C
9.84

Iphigenia (minor planet designation: 112 Iphigenia) is a fairly large and exceedingly dark main-belt asteroid. It is classified as a C-type asteroid, and therefore probably has a primitive carbonaceous composition. It was discovered by German-American astronomer C. H. F. Peters on September 19, 1870, and named after Iphigenia, a princess sacrificed by her father in Greek mythology. The orbital elements for 112 Iphigenia were published by German astronomer Friedrich Tietjen in 1871.[5]

This body is orbiting the Sun with a period of 3.80 years and an eccentricity of 0.13. The orbital plane is inclined by 2.6° to the plane of the ecliptic. 112 Iphigenia has a cross-section diameter of ~72 km. Photometric observations of this asteroid during 2007 at the Observatorio Astronómico de Mallorca were used to create a light curve plot, which was published in 2010. This showed a relatively long synodic rotation period of 31.385±0.006 hours (1.3 days) and a brightness variation of 0.30±0.02 magnitude during each cycle.[6] These findings agree with independent results reported in 2008, which gave a period of 31.466±0.001 hours.[4]

References[]

  1. ^ Noah Webster (1884) A Practical Dictionary of the English Language
  2. ^ a b c Yeomans, Donald K., "112 Iphigenia", JPL Small-Body Database Browser, NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory, retrieved 12 May 2016.
  3. ^ a b c Carry, B. (December 2012), "Density of asteroids", Planetary and Space Science, 73 (1): 98–118, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2012P&SS...73...98C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009. See Table 1.
  4. ^ a b Pilcher, Frederick (June 2008), "Period Determination for 84 Klio, 98 Ianthe, 102 Miriam 112 Iphigenia, 131 Vala, and 650 Amalasuntha", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 35 (2): 71–72, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2008MPBu...35...71P, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.
  5. ^ Tietjen, F. (May 1871), "Elemente der (112) Iphigenia. Aus einem Schreiben des Herrn Dr. F. Tietjen an den Herausgeber" (PDF), Astronomische Nachrichten, 77: 297, Bibcode:1871AN.....77..297T, doi:10.1002/asna.18710771903.
  6. ^ Cikota, Stefan; Cikota, Aleksandar (July 2010), "Lightcurve Photometry of 112 Iphigenia", The Minor Planet Bulletin, 37 (3): 107, arXiv:1203.4336, Bibcode:2010MPBu...37Q.107C, doi:10.1016/j.pss.2012.03.009.

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